Legislative Document, Volume 17 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J.B. Lyon Company, 1921 - New York (State)
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Contents

State Legislation Compulsion for Minors 341213
13
State Legislation Patriotic Measures 3413
14
State Legislation English Language 3414
15
Illiteracy in California 3415
21
Trade Relations With and Recognition of Soviet Russia 421522
22
Suggestions for Speakers on Americanization 342125
25
Bulletin of the Service Citizens of Delaware 35233615
29
Public Schools of New York City 26232700
31
Outlines for Speakers on Americanization 342533
33
Organization of Americanization Work for California 3433
34
European Conditions and Historical Review
37
CHAPTER I
39
International Relations of American Organized Labor 422540
40
Alliance Israelite Universelle 314145
45
State LegislationCompulsion for Minors 364546
46
American Defense Society 314547
47
American Federation of Labor 314748
48
State Legislation Compulsion for Minors 334649
49
Letter from State Commission of Immigration and Housing 344951
51
State Legislation Compulsion for Minors 345253
53
State Legislation Compulsion for Minors 3652
54
State Legislation Flags 345455
55
State Legislation English Language 3455
57
State Legislation Compulsion for Minors 365658
58
State Legislation Compulsion for Minors of Employment Age 334959
59
American Jewish Committee 314860
60
State Legislation Patriotic Measures 365S61
61
Population Figures 3459
62
Letter from Assistant Superintendent of Public Education 3761
63
Americanization Work in Rural Communities 346264
64
State Legislation Providing Facilities for Negroes 336165
65
Americanization Work for Religious Bodies and Through Paro chial Schools 346466
66
Americanization in Industry 346667
67
American Legion 3160
68
State Legislation Patriotic Measures 3670
71
American Rights League 3169
72
State Legislation Compulsion for Minors and Minors of Em ployment Age 367273
73
Subversive Teaching in Certain Schools 144475
75
State LegislationCompulsion for Minors of Employment Age 367376
76
State Legislation Flag 3676
77
Carnegie Foundation 317578
78
Employers Views of Industrial Relations Welfare Work Profit
79
Emergency Peace Federation October 1914 to March 1915 97180
80
Citizenship Training Through Public Schools 3677
81
Americanization Work for Women and Womens Organizations 348182
82
Note on Chaper I Alabama 4278
83
Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York 317884
84
Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association 3185
86
Socialism and Labor in Germany 8790
87
General Introduction 152530
88
American Civil Liberties Union 197989
89
Citizenship Training in Columbus 39894016
90
Socialism and Labor in Italy
91
Letter to School Superintendents 3690
93
State Policy on Americanization 34883522
94
Constitutional League 31S6S9 15 Cooper Union 31S9 16 Federation of Galician and Bucovinian Jews of America 318996
96
Finnish Educational Association of Manhattan 319697
97
CHAPTER VI
98
CHAPTER IV
99
NOTE ON SUBSECTION V
107
CHAPTER V
114
Holland
116
Socialism and Labor in Scandinavia 1575
119
Introduction 201316
122
Switzerland
133
CHAPTER IX
136
Hebrew Sheltering and Immigrant Aid Society of America 31993202
213
Russia and the Revolution
217
Settlement Houses 29493017
227
General Index to Part 1 1246
246
State Legislation Adults 3817
254
CHAPTER XV
368
b Bavarian Communists
372
c Hungarian Communists
373
CHAPTER XVI
413
Political Programs of the American Federation of Labor and of
435
CHAPTER XVII
494
Introduction 60102
501
Census of Aliens 34963501
502
NOTES ON SECTION II AMERICAN CONDITIONS
503
CHAPTER II
510
Florida
562
Naturalization 416972
595
Freedom of Speech 202474
621
CHAPTER III
627
State Legislation Minors of Employment Age 362428
631
APPENDIX
657
CHAPTER IV
676
Introduction 20972105
679
SECTION
681
Record of Constructive Activities in Immigrant Education and Citizen
697
CHAPTER V
739
Communist Labor Party 799817
799
Irish Emigrant Society 3229
812
Socialist Labor Party 81827
818
Investigation into Radical Activities in Upper Part of State 82838
828
Elmira 2582
832
Glens Falls 2584
834
Anarchist Movement in America
839
CHAPTER III
861
Revolutionary Industrial Unionism
871
The Industrial Workers of the World 883906
883
Workers International Industrial Union 90715
907
International Federation of Workers in the Hotel Restaurant Club
916
Organized Labor and Socialism 214850
931
CHAPTER V
934
CHAPTER VI
942
Americanization Work in Progress 2293
950
The Amalgamated Textile Workers of America
951
The International Ladies Garment Workers Union 95859
958
CHAPTER IX
960
CHAPTER I
967
National Peace Federation September 1915 December 4 1915 98187
981
The Ford Peace Party 98892
987
CHAPTER IV
993
Ithaca 2586
994
Note on Chapter XXXVII South Carolina 4418
1003
CHAPTER VI
1024
Organized Labor and Education 216673
1042
CHAPTER VII
1051
Note on Chapter XXXIV Oregon
1063
Development of American League to Limit Armaments December
1077
Note on Chapter XLIII Virginia
1089
CHAPTER IX
1105
CHAPTER X
1112
Mount Vernon 2590
1119
Rochester 2597
1120
CHAPTER XI
1122
State Programs 24392563
1130
Tonawanda 2616
1131
Industries 30793140
1140
37
1142

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 56 - The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles. Freeman and slave, patrician and plebeian, lord and serf, guild-master and journeyman, in a word, oppressor and oppressed, stood in constant opposition to one another...
Page 60 - The bourgeoisie, during its rule of scarce one hundred years, has created more massive and more colossal productive forces than have all preceding generations together.
Page 75 - When, in the course of development, class distinctions have disappeared, and all production has been concentrated in the hands of a: vast association of the whole nation, the public power will lose its political character. Political power, properly so called, is merely the organized power of one class for oppressing another.
Page 59 - It has accomplished wonders far surpassing Egyptian pyramids, Roman aqueducts, and Gothic cathedrals ; it has conducted expeditions that put in the shade all former exoduses of nations and crusades. The bourgeoisie cannot exist without constantly revolutionizing the instruments of production, and thereby the relations of production, and with them the whole relations of society.
Page 49 - That proposition is: that in every historical epoch, the prevailing mode of economic production and exchange, and the social organization necessarily following from it, form the basis upon which is built up, and from which alone can be explained, the political and intellectual history of that epoch...
Page 64 - But every class struggle is a political struggle. And that union, to attain which the burghers of the Middle Ages, with their miserable highways, required centuries, the modern proletarians, thanks to railways, achieve in a few years. This organisation of the proletarians into a class, and consequently into a political party, is continually being upset again by the competition between the workers themselves.
Page 64 - Unions) against the bourgeois; they club together in order to keep up the rate of wages; they found permanent associations in order to make provision beforehand for these occasional revolts. Here and there the contest breaks out into riots. Now and then the workers are victorious, but only for a time. The real fruit of their battles lies, not in the immediate result, but in the ever - expanding union of the workers.
Page 58 - ... railways extended, in the same proportion the bourgeoisie developed, increased its capital, and pushed into the background every class handed down from the Middle Ages. We see, therefore, how the modern bourgeoisie is itself the product of a long course of development, of a series of revolutions in the modes of production and of exchange.
Page 909 - The working class and the employing class have nothing in common. There can be no peace so long as hunger and want are found among millions of working people and the few, who make up the employing class, have all the good things of life.
Page 61 - For many a decade past, the history of industry and commerce is but the history of the revolt of modern productive forces against modern conditions of production, against the property relations that are the conditions for the existence of the bourgeoisie and of its rule.

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