Foreign Authority and the Politics of Impartiality in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina

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ProQuest, 2008 - 350 pages
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Throughout I argue that the exercise of authority and the claiming of legitimacy were fraught because that legitimacy relied upon the ability of foreigners to embody and demonstrate the neutrality, impartiality, morality, and modernity that supposedly set them apart from the Bosnians they were to mediate between and transform. These sources of authority were often nothing more than ideologized distinctions between "international" and local, the universal and particular, Europe and the Balkans, the moral and political, and the traditional and the modern, and frequently proved easy to undo. Moreover, these distinctions produced their own contradictions when confronted with the actual history, politics, and people that made up the intervention encounter. What was at stake, then, was the attempt to fix the international community's authority in a context where this fixity was constantly being questioned by Bosnians who sought to remake the intervention encounter in their own terms.
  

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Contents

A HOBGOBLIN IS STALKING EUROPE
1
CHAPTER
9
BUILDING THE PRESENT
44
Transformation
51
THE LIMITS OF INTERVENTION IN THE GAPS
103
Representative
119
CODA ON POSTSOCIALISM
168
IDENTITY IDEOLOGIES OF ETHNICITY
187
A BRIEF OUTLINE OF THE MAIN TERMS
195
Imperative
203
Ideology as Politics
222
Reconstruction
236
of Return
246
TRANSPARENCY MODERNITY
263
Copyright

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