Southern Quarterly Review, Volume 26 (Google eBook)

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Daniel Kimball Whitaker, Milton Clapp, William Gilmore Simms, James Henley Thornwell
Wiley & Putnam, 1854
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Page 48 - That no man shall be taken or imprisoned, or disseized of his freehold, liberties, or privileges, or outlawed, or exiled, or in any manner destroyed, or deprived of his life, liberty, or property, but by the judgment of his peers or the law of the land.
Page 50 - The natural aristocracy I consider as the most precious gift of nature, for the instruction, the trusts, and government of society. And, indeed, it would have been inconsistent in creation to have formed man for the social state, and not to have provided virtue and wisdom enough to manage the concerns of the society. May we not even say that that form of government is best, which provides the most effectually for a pure selection of these natural aristoi into the offices of government?
Page 141 - In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest of every true American, the consolidation of our Union, in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence.
Page 335 - Have ye not read that he which made them at the beginning made them male and female, and said, 'For this cause shall a man leave father and mother and shall cleave to his wife; and they twain shall be one flesh'? Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh. What therefore God hath joined together, let not man put asunder.
Page 141 - It is obviously impracticable in the federal government of these states, to secure all rights of independent sovereignty to each, and yet provide for the interest and safety of all. Individuals entering into society, must give up a share of liberty to preserve the rest.
Page 277 - Behold, thou hast driven me out this day from the face of the earth ; and from thy face shall I be hid ; and I shall be a fugitive and a vagabond in the earth ; and it shall come to pass, that every one that findeth me shall slay me.
Page 337 - For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife, and they two shall be one flesh.
Page 168 - Why then, take no note of him, but let him go ; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave.
Page 215 - From these things it follows, that in questions of difficulty, or such as are thought so, where more satisfactory evidence cannot be had, or is not seen, if the result of examination be, that there appears, upon the whole, any the lowest presumption on one side, and none on the other, or a greater presumption on one side, though in the lowest degree grea• The Story is told by Mr Locke, in the chapter of Probability. ter, this determines the question, even in matters of speculation...
Page 345 - A specious theory is confuted by this free and perfect experiment, which demonstrates that the liberty of divorce does not contribute to happiness and virtue.

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