The Geography and Resources of Arizona and Sonora: An Address Before the American Geographical and Statistical Society (Google eBook)

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A. Roman & Company, 1863 - Arizona - 124 pages
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Page 114 - There is only one way to wage war against the Apaches. A steady, persistent campaign must be made, following them to their haunts hunting them to the " fastnesses of the mountains." They must be surrounded, starved into coming in, surprised or inveigled by white flags, or any other method, human or divine and then put to death. If these ideas shock any weak-minded individual who thinks himself a philanthropist, I can only say that I pity without respecting his mistaken sympathy. A man...
Page 56 - Great was my surprise, however, when, instead of finding as I expected, barren mountains as at Washoe and Mono, I gazed on beautiful landscapes, and a country covered with trees of different kinds, with fertile lands perfectly watered. True it is that the nearest neighbors, the Apaches, are far from being even equal to the Patagonians ; but this, it seemed to me, could not be a reason for giving to such a beautiful spot, which in spring must be covered with flowers, so savage a name. Mr. Mowry was...
Page 10 - Grande, is par excellence the agricultural district south of the Gila. The valley is wide, very rich soil, and is considerably over one hundred miles in length. Owing to the depredations of the Apaches, no settlements have yet been made in this valley. There is, near the junction of the San Pedro with the Gila, and at the mouth of the Arivypa, a most beautiful and fertile region. A fine growth of ash covers the valley. The Santa Rita Mountains, which separate the San Pedro and Santa Cruz, contain...
Page 18 - By allowing it to remain attached to New Mexico, or by attaching it to Sonora when acquired, the American influence will be swallowed up in the great preponderance of the Mexican vote. The Apache Indian is preparing Sonora for the rule of a higher civilization than the Mexican. In the past half century the Mexican element has disappeared from what is now called Arizona, before the devastating career of the Apache. It is every day retreating farther south, leaving to us (when it is ripe for our possession)...
Page 91 - ... sulphurets, from ignorance of the process for the extraction of the silver. In these sulphurets, and below the old galleries, are situated the present workings. La Colorada, on the north side of the spur, is a portion of the Veta Madre (or main vein), and the workings are firm and perfectly dry.
Page 34 - Grande, in traversing the region examined by Lieutenant Parke between these two rivers, from Dona Ana to the Pimas villages, one appears to be traveling on a great plain, interrupted irregularly and confusedly by bare, rugged, abrupt, isolated mountain masses, or short ranges, seemingly, though not in reality, without system. Winding around these isolated or lost mountains, or using a few passes through them, a railroad may be constructed with easy grades. Except through the mountain passes, the...
Page 56 - By this route freight from San Francisco to the mine does not go beyond five cents per pound. The mine is situated on the last hills forming the eastern slope of the Sierra de Santa Cruz, and is bounded on the northeast by extensive plains covered by the mesquit and oak trees, which reach the line of Sonora, whose elevated mountains rise in the horizon. Between these plains and the mine is to be seen the Sierra Espuela, called also Wachuka mountains.
Page 19 - Libertad, on the Gulf of California, 180 miles. The ores of silver found in southern Arizona are argentiferous galena, native silver, auriferous sulphuret of silver, black sulphuret of silver, sulphate of silver, sulphate of iron combined. The gangue is usually quartz or feldspar. The ores. of copper are usually the sulphurets, principally gray. , Nearly all the silver and copper lodes show traces of gold, and placers have been found at many points, but have not proved sufficiently extensive to attract...
Page 67 - peons" (servants) for generations. They will always remain so, as it is their natural condition.
Page 110 - ... death of the former. Some years later the mine passed into the possession of Messrs. R. Jaquez, I. Parada, and E. Vidal, who worked it until 1861, when Mr. Ramon Andreu rented the mine for two years; the latter stopped working it on account of some difficulties he had with the owners. The vein is G2 nearly perpendicular, running from south to north, with an inclination of from 15 to 20 east, and is about one and a half feet wide on the average. In the bottom of the lowest shaft, which is...

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