School Sewing Based on Home Problems (Google eBook)

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Ginn, 1916 - Sewing - 393 pages
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Page 332 - ... raw edges with stitches one-sixteenth of an inch deep. Do not overcast around the ends of the hole. As soon as the overcasting is done, go right on with the buttonholing without breaking the thread. Hold the buttonhole horizontally over the first finger of the left hand and work from right to left. Insert the point of the needle through the buttonhole (at the back end), bringing the point through toward you four or five threads below the edge of the buttonhole. Bring the doubled thread from the...
Page 332 - ... three or four stitches on a side (fig. 31), to prevent the edges from raveling. This is not necessary for all kinds of cloth. 6. Start the buttonhole stitch from right to left (fig. 32A). The stitches should be so near together that no space is left between. The purl on the edge is made by bringing the thread from the eye of the needle around the point of the needle after the needle is inserted in the cloth. Pull the thread directly toward you, until it is drawn thru all the pIG way; then...
Page 193 - It should of course be realized that the biological value of a given source of nitrogen may vary, depending upon the purpose for which it is to be used in the animal body.
Page 316 - I grasped the lip firmly between the thumb and forefinger of the left hand and with a strong dissecting forceps, pinched out the entire mass with my right hand.
Page 329 - ... to the right side a few threads back from the edge of the hole, leaving an end of the thread about an inch long. Hold this end firmly until you have made several stitches. Take close overhanding stitches from right to left, drawing them tight to make a firm edge. Fasten the thread by taking two or three small stitches on the wrong side thru just one layer of cloth.
Page 365 - To remove last traces of blood stains, sponge with hydrogen peroxide to which a few drops of ammonia have been added.
Page 345 - It is less serviceable, for it is joined to the opening with only one seam, and the corners are held by a single thread.
Page 29 - Education, therefore, comprehends the care of the body, as well as the care of the mind ; and it is thus divided into two great general branches.
Page 9 - In the preparation of this text, which is based upon many years of personal instruction and observation of all types of...
Page 352 - A placket is an opening left in a garment for convenience in putting it on, the raw edges being finished to keep it from tearing or raveling. Plackets are made in skirts, in the bottom of men's shirt sleeves and in the sleeves of ladies' tailored waists, for convenience in laundering.

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