James Knox Polk, and a History of His Administration: Embracing the Annexation of Texas, the Difficulties with Mexico, the Settlement of the Oregon Question, and Other Important Events (Google eBook)

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J. M. Alden, 1851 - United States - 395 pages
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Page 139 - That our title to the whole of the territory of Oregon is clear and unquestionable; that no portion of the same ought to be ceded to England or any other power; and that the re-occupation of Oregon and the re-annexation of Texas at the earliest practicable period are great American measures, which this convention recommends to the cordial support of the Democracy of the Union.
Page 138 - That the liberal principles embodied by Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence, and sanctioned in the Constitution, which makes ours the land of liberty and the asylum of the oppressed of every nation, have ever been cardinal principles in the democratic faith...
Page 148 - ... peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none: the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns, and the surest bulwarks against anti-republican tendencies: the preservation of the general government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home, and safety abroad...
Page 237 - That if the President of the United States shall, in his judgment and discretion, deem it most advisable, instead of proceeding to submit the foregoing resolution to the Republic of Texas as an overture on the part of the United States for admission, to negotiate with that Republic, then...
Page 27 - ... 4. Resolved, that as we now acknowledge the existence and control of no law or legal officer, civil or military, within this county, we do hereby ordain and adopt as a rule of life all, each and every of our former laws wherein nevertheless the Crown of Great Britain never can be considered as holding rights, privileges, immunities, or authority therein.
Page 381 - ... an honorable peace, and thereby secure ample indemnity for the expenses of the war. as well as to our much-injured citizens who hold large pecuniary demands against Mexico.
Page 390 - An act to provide for the better organization of the treasury, and for the collection, safe-keeping, transfer, and disbursement of the public revenue...
Page 153 - That justice and sound policy forbid the federal government to foster one branch of industry to the detriment of another, or to cherish the interests of one portion to the injury of another portion of our common country...
Page 105 - Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever state or persuasion, religious or political; peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations, entangling alliances with none; the support of the State governments in all their rights, as the most competent administrations for our domestic concerns and the surest bulwarks against antirepublican tendencies; the preservation of the General Government in its whole constitutional vigor, as the sheet anchor of our peace at home and safety abroad...
Page 27 - That we, the citizens of Mecklenburg County, do hereby dissolve the political bands which have connected us to the mother country, and hereby absolve ourselves from all allegiance to the British Crown...

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