The Journal of the Royal Geographical Society of London, Volume 25 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1855 - Geography
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"List of geographical works and maps recently published" in vol. 6-11.
  

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Page xliii - RUSSIAN SHORES OF THE BLACK SEA In the Autumn of 1852. With a Voyage down the Volga and a Tour through the Country of the Don Cossacks. By LAURENCE OLIPHANT, Esq.
Page 361 - History of Latin Christianity ; including that of the Popes to the Pontificate of Nicholas V.
Page 315 - BIRT'S (WR) Hurricane Guide. Being an Attempt to connect the Rotatory Gale, or Revolving Storm, with Atmospheric Waves.
Page 315 - Notes and Diagrams illustrative of the Directions of the Forces acting at and near the Surface of the Earth, in different parts of the Brunswick Tornado of June 10, 1835.
Page xlv - Coins of Ancient Lycia before the Reign of Alexander; with an Essay on the Relative Dates of the Lycian Monuments in the British Museum (1855).
Page 138 - IN May, 1849, the late Admiral Sir Charles Malcolm, an ardent geographer and a warm encourager of adventure, in concert with the President and Secretary of the Royal Geographical Society, urged upon the Honourable the Court of Directors of the East India Company...
Page 253 - None of the Esquimaux with whom I had communication saw the " white" men, either when living or after death ; nor had they ever been at the place where the corpses were found, but had their information from those who had been there, and who had seen the party when travelling on the ice.
Page l - PRINCE ALBERT IN SEARCH OF SIR JOHN FRANKLIN : A Narrative of Every-day Life in the Arctic Seas. By W. PARKER SNOW.
Page 253 - From the mutilated state of many of the corpses, and the contents of the kettles, it is evident that our wretched countrymen had been driven to the last resource cannibalism as a means of prolonging existence.
Page 252 - Land, which is a large island. None of the party could speak the Esquimaux language intelligibly, but by signs the natives were made to understand that their ship, or ships, had been crushed by ice, and that they were now going to where they expected to find deer to shoot. From the appearance of the men, all of whom...

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