The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies (Google eBook)

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 - United States
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Review: War of the Rebellion Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

User Review  - John Ervin - Goodreads

If you can find copies of this set,, the copies were even becoming rare. You might want to add Foxe's reports to this set as well. for it covers the medical aspects from wounded to dead for the Union and Confederate armies>>land and naval. Read full review

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Page 83 - I know you will not misunderstand it) is, that in view of any satisfactory results, you draw back this army to the intrenchments in front of Washington, and set to work in that secure place to reorganize and rearrange it. You may avoid great disaster by doing so.
Page 537 - States, and forever disqualified from holding any office of trust or profit under the Government of the United States.
Page 10 - ... exposing both to destruction, and yet they must be united. To send Pope's forces by water to the Peninsula is, under present circumstances, a military impossibility. The only alternative is to send the forces on the Peninsula to some point by water, say Fredericksburg, where the two armies can be united.
Page 722 - Justiciars of co-ordinate authority, one on the north and the other on the south of the...
Page 40 - I am very sure now, that it was easily practicable for him to have turned the right flank of Jackson, and to have fallen upon his rear; that if he had done so, we should have gained a decisive victory over the army under Jackson before he could have been joined by any of the forces of Longstreet, and that the army of General Lee would have been so crippled and checked by the destruction of this large force as to have been no longer in condition to prosecute further operations of an aggressive character.
Page 559 - Jones advanced on the extreme right, and the whole line swept steadily on, driving the enemy with great carnage from each successive position until 10 pm, when darkness put an end to the battle and the pursuit.
Page 10 - I had great confidence, to make the order immediately on my arrival here, but I determined not to do so until I could learn your wishes from a personal interview. And even after that interview I tried every means in my power to avoid withdrawing your army, and delayed my decision as long as I dared to delay it. , "I assure you, general, it was not a hasty and inconsiderate act, but one that caused me more anxious thoughts than any other of my life.
Page 9 - ... commencement of this war, I do now, what I never did in my life before, I entreat that this order may be rescinded. If my counsel does not prevail, I will with a sad heart obey your...
Page 42 - Heintzelman and Reno on the right. It became apparent that the enemy was massing his troops, as fast as they arrived on the field, on his right, and was moving forward from that direction to turn our left, at which point it was plain he intended to make his main attack. I accordingly directed General McDowell to recall Ricketts' division immediately from our right, and post it on the left of our line.
Page 51 - ... pay to the United States, in money or in property, to be levied by military force, the full amount of the pay and subsistence of the whole force necessary to coerce the performance of the work during the time occupied in completing it.

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