Paul Hentzner's Travels in England: During the Reign of Queen Elizabeth (Google eBook)

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E. Jeffery, 1797 - Great Britain - 152 pages
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Page 35 - At the end of all this ceremonial a number of unmarried ladies appeared, who, with particular solemnity, lifted the meat off the, table, and conveyed it into the queen's inner and more private chamber, where, after she had chosen for herself, the rest goes to the ladies of the court.
Page 28 - To this entertainment, there often follows that of whipping a blinded bear, which is performed by five or six men, standing circularly with whips, which they exercise upon him without any mercy...
Page 34 - A gentleman entered the room bearing a rod, and along with him another, who had a table-cloth, which, after they had both kneeled three times with the utmost veneration, he spread upon the table, and after kneeling again they both retired. Then came two others, one with the rod again, the other with a...
Page 61 - They excel in dancing and music, for they are active and lively, though of a thicker make than the French; they cut their hair close on the middle of the head, letting it grow on either side; they are good sailors, and better pirates, cunning, treacherous, and thievish; above 300 are said to be hanged annually at London.
Page 24 - We were next led to the Armoury, in which are these particularities : spears out of which you may shoot ; shields that will give fire four times ; a great many rich halberds, commonly called partisans, with which the guard defend the royal person in battle; some lances covered with red and green velvet, and the suit of armour of King Henry VIII.
Page 33 - That day she was dressed in white silk, bordered with pearls of the size of beans, and over it a mantle of black silk shot with silver threads ; her train was very long, the end of it borne by a marchioness ; instead of a chain she had an oblong collar of gold and jewels.
Page 32 - London, a great number of counsellors of State, officers of the Crown and gentlemen who waited the Queen's coming out, which she did from her own apartment when it was time to go to prayers...
Page 126 - Per mare, per terras, currit mercator ad Indos, He might also have said, and truly with the Phylosopher, Omnia mea mecum porto ; For it was a long time before he could brag of more than he carried at his back ; and when he got on the winning side, it was his...
Page 48 - ... seats fitted up in the time of Edward III for an equal number of Knights ; this venerable building is decorated with the noble monuments of Edward IV, Henry VI, and VIII, and of his wife queen Jane. It receives from royal liberality the annual income of two thousand pounds, and that still much increased by the munificence of Edward III and Henry VII.
Page 28 - ... tobacco, and in this manner: they have pipes on purpose made of clay, into the farther end of which they put the Herb, so dry that it may be rubbed into powder, and putting fire to it, they draw the smoke into their mouths, which they puff out again, through their nostrils, like funnels, along with it plenty of phlegm and defluxion from the head.

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