English grammar and composition (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Thompson, Brown Co., 1911 - English language - 322 pages
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Contents

Conjunctions use of illustrated defined
12
Interjections use of illustrated defined
14
Parts of Speech named
15
Clauses complex sentences use of defined
16
Compound Sentences use of shown defined
18
Kinds of Subjects and Predicates defined
20
Verbs of Complete and Incomplete Predication comple ments of verb
22
Modifiers kinds of
24
Simple and Complete Subjects
25
Simple and Complete Predicates
26
Kinds of Sentences
27
The Simple Sentence
29
The Compound Sentence
30
Analysis of Simple Sentence
33
Analysis of Complex Sentence
34
Analysis of Compound Sentence
35
Classes of Nouns
36
Properties of Nouns Person
38
Number
40
Gender
42
Case
44
Declension
49
Personal Pronouns
52
Interrogative Pronouns
55
Relative Pronouns
57
Adjective Pronouns
62
Parsing Pronouns
64
Kinds of Adjectives
65
Articles
67
Comparison of Adjectives
68
Regular Comparison
70
Irregular Comparison
71
Number of Adjectives
73
Parsing Adjectives
74
XLVm Transitive Verbs
75
Intransitive Verbs
76
Voice
78
Mode
79
Infinitive Mode
82
Present Participle
83
Past Participle
85
Tense
87
LVTJ Forms of the Tenses
90
LVm Person and Number
92
L1X Regular and Irregular Verbs
94
Conjugation of the Verb
96
Conjugation of the Verb Have
97
Conjugation of the Verb Do
100
Conjugation of the Verb Be
101
Conjugation of the Regular Transitive Verb Love
105
Formation of the Tenses
111
Defective Verbs use of illustrated
115
LXVIT Impersonal Verbs use of illustrated
116
Irregular Verbs list of
117
SECTIOX PAGE LXIX Parsing Verbs
125
Adverbs kinds of illustrated phrases clauses
127
Comparison of Adverbs
129
LXX1I Parsing the Adverb
131
Prepositions
132
LXX1V List of Prepositions
135
Parsing Prepositions
136
Coordinate Conjunctions
137
Subordinate Conjunctions
138
Correlative Conjunctions
140
Parsing Conjunctions
141
Interjections use of list of
142
Parsing Interjections
143
Uses of Words illustrated
144
Syntax laws of
146
The Simple Sentence subject and predicate defined
147
The Complex Sentence clauses
148
The Noun Clause use of denned
149
The Adjective Clause use of denned
150
The Subject simple and enlarged
151
XC1I The Predicate simple and enlarged
155
Meaning of Sentences
158
The Elements of Sentences
161
Agreement of Case 102
162
Agreement of Adjective and Noun 104
164
Agreement of Pronoun and Antecedent 105
165
Agreement of Tenses Clauses 100
166
Agreement of Modes and Tenses 107
167
Figurative Language 108
168
Punctuation
175
Terminal Marks
176
SECTION PAOB CV1I The Interrogation Point
177
Other Marks of Punctuation comma semicolon quotation marks dash parentheses
178
Sentences and Selections from Literature
208
Verbs and their Subjects
210
Adjectives and their Nouns
212
Adverbs and the Words they Modify
215
Phrases Kinds and Uses
217
CXX1V Clauses Kinds and Uses
219
Clauses Kinds and Uses
220
Clauses Adjective and Adverbial
221
Clauses How Used
222
Subjects Predicates and Phrases
224
Clauses How Used
226
Kinds of Sentences Phrases and Clauses
229
Uses of Nouns
237
Indirect Objects
239
Pronouns and their Antecedents
240
Verbs Transitive and Intransitive
241
Uses of Infinitives
242
Participles Kinds and Uses
244
Choice Literary Selections
246
Eloquence of OConnell
247
From The Deserted Village
249
Extract from Websters Bunker Hill Oration
251
Tact and Talent
252
What Constitutes a State
254
From the Legend of Sleepy Hollow
255
Our Country
256
The Love of Country and of Home
257
Fitz James and Ellen
258
ENGLISH COMPOSITION 1 The Blessed Gift of Speech
261
Talk should be Guarded
262
Comparison of Oral and Written Composition
263
The Worth of Good Composition
264
Punctuation of Sentences
265
Outline and Topics
266
Interest Aids in Selection of Subjects
267
Reading
268
Compositions from Experience
269
Variety of Subjects
270
More than was Told
271
Suggestive Helps
272
Subjects should not cover too Wide a Field
273
A Good Practice
274
Other Subjects
276
Retell the Story before Writing
277
Study of Models
278
Unity in Expression
279
Orderly Arrangement
280
The Point of the Story
281
Methods of Testing our Work
282
Helps in Recalling Experiences
283
Subjects from Experience
284
How to make Lists of Subjects
285
Subjects should be Limited
286
The Use of Imagination in Composition
287
Narrow Use of Imagination Story
288
Imagination Essential to Human Progress
289
Story How I can help Mother
291
Subjects in Real Life
293
An Imaginative Life Picture
294
Exaggerat ions of Imagination
295
Imaginative Impossibilities
296
Judgment in the Use of Imagination
297
How to interpret Literature
298
Narration
299
Study for Thought and Form
300
Discussion of Franklins Story
301
Selfdependence First Law of Progress
302
Description
303
Description Limited
304
The Broad View
305
Landscapes in Literature
306
Study of Personal Description
307
Character Study
308
Narration with Description
309
Rapid Narration with Description
310
Value of Descriptive Words
311
Subjects for Explanation
312
Subject Answers to How
313
Explanations from Experience
315
SECTION PAGE 104 The Value of Explanation
316
Argument
317
Choice of Actions
318
Letter Writing Correspondence
319
Franklin Letters
321
Abraham Lincolns Letter to Mrs Bixby
322
Copyright

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Page 231 - Three millions of people, armed in the holy cause of liberty, and in such a country as that which we possess, are invincible by any force which our enemy can send against us.
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Page 19 - It is a beauteous evening, calm and free, The holy time is quiet as a Nun Breathless with adoration; the broad sun Is sinking down in its tranquillity; The gentleness of heaven broods o'er the Sea: Listen!
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Page 166 - That orbed maiden with white fire laden, Whom mortals call the moon, Glides glimmering o'er my fleece-like floor, By the midnight breezes strewn ; And wherever the beat of her unseen feet, Which only the angels hear, May have broken the woof of my tent's thin roof, The stars peep behind her and peer ; And I laugh to see them whirl and flee, Like a swarm of golden bees, When I widen the rent in my wind-built tent...
Page 237 - LISTEN, my children, and you shall hear Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere, On the eighteenth of April, in Seventyfive ; Hardly a man is now alive Who remembers that famous day and year. He said to his friend, " If the British march By land or sea from the town to-night, Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch Of the North Church tower as a signal light, One, if by land, and...
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