The ladies' companion to the Flower garden: Being an alphabetical arrangement of all the ornamental plants usually grown in gardens and shrubberies; with full directions for their culture (Google eBook)

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Bradbury & Evans, 1865 - Floriculture - 382 pages
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Page 163 - E'en the slight hare-bell raised its head, Elastic from her airy tread : What though upon her speech there hung The accents of the mountain tongue, Those silver sounds, so soft, so dear, The listener held his breath to hear.
Page 165 - ... raised defies all calculation. The Heart's-ease must be grown in very rich soil, composed, if in pots or boxes, of four parts of rich loam, one of sand, and one of decayed leaves or rotten dung ; and if in the open ground, of rich loam highly manured. It is propagated by seeds, or division of the root. The seeds should be sown, as soon as they are ripe, in a bed, where the young plants should remain till they flower, when the best should be taken up and replanted in another bed, or in well-drained...
Page v - ... illustrated with numerous plates ; the work comprises a Dictionary of the English and Botanic names of the most popular flowers, with directions for their culture. Altogether we ; should judge it to be the most valuable work in the department to which it ( belongs.
Page 317 - SPAETIUM. and returning it to its place with the surface downwards ; then breaking it finely, and levelling and smoothing the surface; and lastly depressing, or slightly hollowing out a circle from three to six inches in diameter, and from a quarter to half an inch in depth, according to the size of the seeds to be sown. As most seeds germinate best when gently pressed into the soil, a very good mode for amateurs is to take the saucer of a flower-pot, of the diameter of the patch, and gently press...
Page 26 - ... where it may enjoy complete repose for about a month. In October or November it should be repotted, and supplied with abundance of water, particularly if kept in a sitting-room, where there is a daily fire. It should indeed always stand in a saucer full of water (^changing the water every day), as the plant will not flower if once suffered to become too dry while in a growing state ; and as it has the extraordinary power of discharging the superabundant water from the points of its leaves, in...
Page 243 - ... a tree of the Common Holly. PE.RENNIAL, PLANTS are those permanent plants which are not woody, but which generally die down to the ground every year and spring up again the year following. There are some, however, which are called evergreen perennials, which never die down to the ground, such as Pinks, Carnations, several kinds of Saxifrage, &c. Perennials have the great advantage over annuals and biennials, that they do not require renewal from seed, but are propagated by division of the root...
Page 387 - Nature-printed British ferns : being figures and descriptions of the species and varieties of ferns found in the United Kingdom. Nature-printed by Henry Bradbury 2 vol.
Page 255 - Acer tribe, having numerous fibres near the main stem, require but little pruning of the head. The same may be said of the Yew and the Holly, the Lime and the Elm. When the object of the planter is to produce immediate effect by a bulky head, all the branches may be left on, whatever may be the kind of tree ; but in that case the tree will produce only leaves for a number of years, or if it produce shoots they will not exceed a few lines in length. Ultimately, if the soil be poor and dry, the tree...
Page 177 - ... strong shoot attached to a piece of the tuber, or old stem ; each of these will, if properly managed, make a plant. Those who may commence cultivating at an early season, should put the plants thus separated into small pots, and keep them in a growing state until about the middle of May, at which time they may be turned out of the pots with the balls of earth entire, and planted in the open borders, from three to four feet from each other. Let the ground be well pulverised, and enriched with...
Page 21 - A. m. caryophylloldes, has the flowers striped like those of a flaked carnation. All the species of Snapdragon grow in any soil that is tolerably dry, and they are readily increased by cuttings ; for though they produce abundance of seeds, yet the varieties can only be perpetuated with certainty by the former mode of propagation. The beautiful carnation-like variety will, indeed, very seldom produce striped flowers two years in succession from the same root ; and thus a person who has purchased a...

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