History of Scotland, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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W. Tait, 1845 - Scotland
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Page 59 - The lady happened at the moment to be pursuing the diversion of the chase, surrounded by a retinue of her squires and damsels. They encountered Bruce. The young Countess was struck ,by his noble figure, and courteously entreated him to remain and take the recreation of hunting. Bruce who, in those feudal days, knew the danger of paying too much attention to a ward of the king, declined the invitation, when he found himself suddenly surrounded by the attendants ; and the lady, riding up, seized his...
Page 192 - I quote the words of the deed, " it is covenanted, that if he thinks proper to surrender himself, it must be unconditionally to the will and mercy of our lord the king.
Page 382 - Roslin, whom he saw in jeopardy. In attempting this, he was inextricably involved with the enemy. Taking from his neck the casket which contained the heart of Bruce, he cast it before him, and exclaimed with a loud voice, ' Now pass onward as thou wert wont, and Douglas will follow thee or die!
Page 40 - August, 1263,1 and to have been annular at Ronaldsvoe in Orkney ; a fine example of the clear and certain light reflected by the exact sciences upon history. Early in August, the king sailed across the Pentland Firth, having left orders for the Orkney men to follow him when their preparations were completed ; thence he proceeded by the Lewes to...
Page 367 - ... submit themselves to the jurisdiction of the Papal chamber. It was finally covenanted, that the laws and regulations of the marches were to be punctually adhered to by both monarchs ; and although omitted in the treaty, it was stipulated in...
Page 219 - Edward was knighted by his father, and then conferred that honour on his companions. A magnificent feast followed, at which two swans covered with nets of gold being set on the table by the minstrels, the king rose and made a solemn vow to God...
Page 333 - Divine Providence, and the right of succession according to those laws and customs, which we will maintain to the death, as well as the common consent of us all, have made our prince and king. To him are we bound both by his own merit and by the law of the land, and to him, as the saviour of our people and the guardian of our liberty,arewe unanimously determined to adhere...
Page 199 - What were the particular measures adopted by Haliburton, or with whom he co-operated, it is now impossible to determine ; but it is certain that, soon after this, Wallace was betrayed and taken by Sir John Menteith, a Scottish baron of high rank. Perhaps we are to trace this infamous transaction to a family feud. At the battle of Falkirk, Wallace, who, on account of his overbearing conduct, had never been popular with the Scottish nobility, opposed the pretensions of Sir John Stewart of Bonkill,...
Page 152 - These mean and selfish jealousies were increased by the terror of Edward's military renown, and in many by the fear of losing their English estates ; so that at the very time when an honest love of liberty, and a simultaneous spirit of resistance, could alone have saved Scotland, its nobility deserted it at its utmost need, and refused to act with the only man whose military talents and prosperity were equal to the emergency.
Page 289 - Many in their flight got entangled in the pits, which they seem to have avoided in their first attack, and were there suffocated or slain ; others, who vainly endeavoured to pass the rugged banks of the...

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