The Blooding (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Open Road Media, Nov 29, 2011 - True Crime - 282 pages
42 Reviews
This is the suspenseful and powerful true story of the discovery of DNA identification by a university geneticist in the Midlands of England—which changed the world of forensic science and police work forever—and of its very first use in the hunt for a serial killer who terrorized a quiet English village. Playboy said, “this book holds the tension and excitement of an imaginative police novel.” Yet every word of it is true.
  

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Review: The Blooding

User Review  - Don Arthur - Goodreads

Next to The Onion Field, this is Wambaugh's best book in my opinion. He or his associates did an enormous amount of research which made a informative and interesting book. Don Arthur Read full review

Review: The Blooding

User Review  - Michael Robotham - Goodreads

My second reading of this one - for research purposes this time. A well constructed, compelling non-fiction account of the very first time that DNA was used to both exonerate an innocent man and catch the guilty one. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 18
Section 19
Section 20
Section 21
Section 22
Section 23
Section 24
Section 25

Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 12
Section 13
Section 14
Section 15
Section 16
Section 17
Section 26
Section 27
Section 28
Section 29
Section 30
Section 31
Section 32
Section 33

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About the author (2011)

The son of a policeman, Joseph Wambaugh (b. 1937) began his writing career while a member of the Los Angeles Police Department. He joined the LAPD in 1960 after three years in the Marine Corps, and rose to the rank of detective sergeant before retiring in 1974. His first novel, The New Centurions (1971), was a quick success, drawing praise for its realistic action and intelligent characterization, and was adapted into a feature film starring George C. Scott. He followed it up with The Blue Knight (1972), which was adapted into a mini-series starring William Holden and Lee Remick. Since then Wambaugh has continued writing about the LAPD. He has been credited with a realistic portrayal of police officers, showing them not as superheroes but as men struggling with a difficult job, a depiction taken mainstream by television’s Police Story, which Wambaugh helped create in the mid-1970s. In addition to novels, Wambaugh has written nonfiction, winning a special Edgar Award for 1974’s The Onion Field, an account of the longest criminal trial in California history. His most recent work is the novel Hollywood Moon (2010).

Bibliographic information