Arboretum Et Fruticetum Britannicum: Or, The Trees and Shrubs of Britain, Native and Foreign, Hardy and Half-hardy, Pictorially and Botanically Delineated, and Scientifically and Popularly Described; with Their Propagation, Culture, Management, and Uses in the Arts, in Useful and Ornamental Plantations, and in Landscape-gardening; Preceded by a Historical and Geographical Outline of the Trees and Shrubs of Temperate Climates Throughout the World, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Henry G. Bohn, 1854 - Botany
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Contents

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Page 1019 - On Christmas eve the bells were rung, On Christmas eve the mass was sung: * That only night in all the year Saw the stoled priest the chalice rear.
Page 896 - He then pledges him in a curious toast: the company follow his example with all the other oxen, addressing each by his name. This being finished, the large cake is produced, and, with much ceremony, put on the horn of the first ox, through the hole above mentioned.
Page 958 - Right in the middest of that Paradise There stood a stately mount, on whose round top A gloomy grove of mirtle trees did rise...
Page 1202 - And of an humbler growth, the other tall, And throwing up into the darkest gloom Of neighbouring cypress, or more sable yew, Her silver globes, light as the foamy surf That the wind severs from the broken wave; The lilac various in array, now white, Now sanguine, and her beauteous head now set With purple spikes pyramidal, as if Studious of ornament, yet unresolved Which hue she most approved, she chose them all...
Page 782 - But in this delicious garden of Negaaristan, the eye and the smell are not the only senses regaled by the presence of .the Rose. The ear is enchanted by the wild and beautiful notes of multitudes of nightingales, whose warblings seem to increase in melody and softness with the unfolding of their favorite flowers. Here, indeed, the stranger is more powerfully reminded that he is in the genuine country of the nightingale and the Rose.
Page 896 - Here's to thee, old apple-tree, Whence thou mayst bud, and whence thou mayst blow ! And whence thou mayst bear apples enow ! Hats full! caps full! Bushel bushel sacks full, And my pockets full too ! Huzza...
Page 1099 - ... and, when they pair in the spring, throw mud and water over its leaves and branches. As the distressed virgin cast down her blushing face through excessive affliction, so does this rosy-coloured flower hang its head, growing paler and paler till it withers away. Hence, as this plant forms a new genus, I have chosen for it the name of Andromeda...
Page 1099 - This plant is always fixed on some little turfy hillock in the midst of the swamps, as Andromeda herself was chained to a rock in the sea, which bathed her feet, as the fresh water does the roots of the plant.
Page 1203 - Acacia is one of the most common, and at the same time one of the most...
Page 753 - England by Master Nicholas Lete, a worthy merchant of London, and a great lover of flowers, from Constantinople, which (as we hear) was first brought thither from Syria...

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