The Complete Works of Sir Walter Scott: With a Biography, and His Last Additions and Illustrations, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Conner & Cooke, 1833 - English literature
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Page 87 - The Templar has destroyed the plank on which they crossed - few of the defenders escaped with him into the castle the shrieks and cries which you hear tell the fate of the others - Alas! I see it is still more difficult to look upon victory than upon battle/
Page 45 - So saying, he again bent his bow, but on the present occasion looked with attention to his weapon, and changed the string, which he thought was no longer truly round, having been a little frayed by the two former shots. He then took his aim with some deliberation, and the multitude awaited the event in breathless silence. The archer vindicated their opinion of his skill : his arrow split the willow rod against which it was aimed. A jubilee of acclamations followed ; and even Prince John, in admiration...
Page 45 - I will do my best, as Hubert says," answered Locksley; " no man can do more." So saying, he again bent his bow, but on the present occasion looked with attention to his weapon, and changed the string, which he thought was no longer truly round, having been a little frayed by the two former shots. He then took his aim with some deliberation, and the multitude awaited the event in breathless silence. The archer vindicated their opinion of his skill : his arrow split the willow rod against which it...
Page 87 - John of Acre," said Ivanhoe, raising himself joyfully on his couch, "methought there was but one man in England that might do such a deed!" "The postern gate shakes," continued Rebecca; "it crashes - it is splintered by his blows - they rush in - the outwork is won - Oh, God!
Page 31 - At length, as the Saracenic music of the challengers concluded one of those long and high flourishes with which they had broken the silence of the lists, it was answered by a solitary trumpet, which breathed a note of defiance from the northern extremity. All eyes were turned to see the new champion which these sounds announced, and no sooner were the barriers opened than he paced into the lists.
Page 87 - They have - they have!" exclaimed Rebecca - "and they press the besieged hard upon the outer wall; some plant ladders, some swarm like bees, and endeavour to ascend upon the shoulders of each other - down go stones, beams, and trunks of trees upon their heads, and as fast as they bear the wounded to the rear, fresh men supply their places in the assault - Great God! hast thou given men thine own image, that it should be thus cruelly defaced by the hands of their brethren!" "Think not of that," said...
Page 45 - Locksley returned almost instantly with a willow wand about six feet in length, perfectly straight, and rather thicker than a man's thumb. He began to peel this with great composure, observing at the same time that to ask a good woodsman to shoot at a target so broad as had hitherto been used was to put shame upon his skill. 'For his own part...
Page 86 - And I must lie here like a bedridden monk," exclaimed Ivanhoe, " while the game that gives me freedom or death is played out by the hand of others ! — Look from the window once again, kind maiden, but beware that you • are not marked by the archers beneath — Look out once more, and tell me if they yet advance to the storm.
Page 26 - The form of the enclosure was an oblong square, save that the corners were considerably rounded off, in order to afford more convenience for the spectators. The openings for the entry of the combatants were at the northern and southern extremities of the lists, accessible by strong wooden gates, each wide enough to admit two horsemen riding abreast. At each of these portals were stationed two heralds, attended by six trumpets, as many pursuivants, and a strong body of men-at-arms for maintaining...
Page 87 - Front-de-Boeuf heads the defenders; I see his gigantic form above the press. They throng again to the breach, and the pass is disputed hand to hand, and man to man. God of Jacob! it is the meeting of two fierce tides— the conflict of two oceans moved by adverse winds!

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