Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to Calculation

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W. H. Freeman, 1976 - Computer programming. - 300 pages
7 Reviews
Examines the sources of the computer's powers and offers evaluative explorations of what computers can do, cannot do, and should not be employed to do. Bibliogs

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Review: Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgement to Calculation

User Review  - Paul Berry - Goodreads

A book too important to be read just once. Read full review

Review: Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgement to Calculation

User Review  - Alex Railean - Goodreads

I really enjoyed this one, it covers the problem from many aspects and the author places a great emphasis on the moral side of the issue too. Besides that, if you're interested in understanding how ... Read full review

About the author (1976)

Born in Berlin, Germany, Joseph Weizenbaum immigrated to the United States as a child. He is among the world's foremost computer scientists, as well as a pioneer in the field of computer ethics. An outspoken critic of overdependence on and misuse of powerful new computers, Weizenbaum claims that individual privacy is being depleted rapidly by the computer revolution. He also is concerned about the increasing role of computer technology in warfare and claims that computers have made combat more deadly and potentially catastrophic. Weizenbaum worked for General Electric as a computer systems engineer in the late 1950s and early 1960s, before becoming an instructor in the Department of Computer Science at MIT in 1963. In 1970 he was appointed professor of computer science and engineering at MIT and also became editor of the International Journal of Man-Machine Studies. In his published work, Weizenbaum emphasizes the dangers associated with substituting computer technology for human to human contact in counseling, legal situations, and language translation. In 1973 Weizenbaum was honored as the Vinton Hays Senior Research Fellow at Harvard University.

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