The life of Poggio Bracciolini (Google eBook)

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Page 86 - ... had been confined three hundred and forty days in a dark dungeon, where it was impossible for him to read, and where he must have daily suffered from the utmost anxiety of mind, yet he quoted so many learned writers in defence of his opinions, and supported his sentiments by the authority of so many doctors of the church, that any one would have been led to believe that he had devoted all the time of his imprisonment to the peaceful and undisturbed study of philosophy. His voice was sweet, clear,...
Page 111 - A compilation from earlier historical works made, in the form in which we have it, at the end of the thirteenth or the beginning of the fourteenth century and known by the name of WALTER OF COVENTRY (W.
Page 87 - ... led to believe that he had devoted all the time of his imprisonment to the peaceful and undisturbed study of philosophy. His voice was sweet, clear, and sonorous ; his action dignified, and well adapted either to express indignation or to excite compassion, which, however, he neither wished nor asked for ; he stood undaunted and intrepid, not merely contemning, but, like another Cato, longing for death : he was a man worthy to be had in everlasting remembrance.
Page 81 - ... pathetic tone of voice, Fathers ! To whom shall I have recourse for succour ? Whose assistance shall I implore ? Unto whom shall I appeal, in protestation of my innocence ? Unto you.? But these my persecutors have prejudiced your minds against me, by declaring that I entertain hostility against all my judges. Thus have they artfully endeavoured, if they cannot reach me by their imputations of error, so to excite your fears, that you may be induced to seize any plausible pretext to destroy your...
Page 86 - It is a wonderful instance of his memory, that though he had been confined three hundred and forty days in a dark dungeon, where it was impossible for him to read, and where he must have daily suffered from the utmost anxiety of mind, yet he quoted so many learned writers in defence of his opinions, and supported his sentiments by the authority of so many doctors of the church, that any one would have been led to believe that he had...
Page 82 - One man, who was particularly inveterate against him, he never addressed but by the title of ass or dog. As, on account of the number and importance of the articles exhibited against him, the cause could not be determined at that sitting, the court was adjourned to another day, on which the proofs of each article of impeachment were read over and confirmed by more witnesses. Then he arose and said, "Since you have attended so diligently to my adversaries, I have a right to demand that you should...
Page 79 - ... me for a single hour ! The consequence of this is, that while on the one hand, every one's ears are open to them, and they have for so long a time been attempting to persuade you that I am a heretic, an enemy of the true faith, a persecutor of the clergy ; and on the other hand, I am deprived of every opportunity of defending myself...
Page 87 - I must not omit a striking circumstance, which shows the firmness of his mind. When the executioner was going to apply the fire behind him, in order that he might not see it, he said, "Come this way, and kindle it in my sight, for had I been afraid of it I should never have come to this place.
Page 85 - Jerome had thus differed in opinion, and had upon some points even held contrary sentiments, without any suspicion of heresy. All the audience entertained hopes that he would either clear himself by retracting the heresies which were objected to him, or supplicate pardon for his errors. But he maintained that he had not erred, and that therefore he had nothing to retract. He next began to praise John...
Page 80 - ... mischief.' These and many other observations he made with great eloquence ; but he was interrupted by the murmurs and clamour of several of his auditors. It was decreed, that he should first answer to the charges exhibited against him, and afterwards have free liberty of speech. The heads of the accusation were accordingly read from the desk. When, after they had been proved by testimony, he was asked whether he had any remarks...

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