Burning to Read: English Fundamentalism and Its Reformation Opponents

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Harvard University Press, 2007 - History - 346 pages
5 Reviews
Amid present-day conflagrations, this illuminating book reminds us of the sources, and profound consequences, of Christian fundamentalism in the sixteenth century. Simpson focuses on the cultural transformation in early modern England that allowed common people to read the Bible for the first time. The last wave of fundamentalist reading in the West provoked 150 years of violent upheaval; as we approach a second wave, this powerful book alerts us to our peril.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - karl.steel - LibraryThing

Several months ago, visiting family, someone mentioned that he had just returned from a sermon on Ezekiel 16. We asked, "what did the pastor say?" "Do what God wants or else." If you don't know ... Read full review

Review: Burning to Read: English Fundamentalism and Its Reformation Opponents

User Review  - Alex - Goodreads

A very smooth, engaging prose makes this work quite enjoyable. It poses itself as a revisionist history of the reformation, but to a Catholic like myself (who has been hearing accounts of the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Two Hundred Years of Biblical Violence
10
Good Bible News
34
Salvation Reading and Textual Hatred
68
The Literal Sense and Predestination
106
Bible Reading Persecution and Paranoia
142
History as Error
184
Thomas More and Textual Trust
222
The Tragic Scene of Early Modern Reading
260
Abbreviations
284
Notes
285
Index
341
Copyright

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