The British Essayists: The Rambler (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, J. Nichols and Son, R. Baldwin, F. and C. Rivington, W. Otridge and Son, W. J. and J. Richardson, A. Strahan, J. Sewell, R. Faulder, G. and W. Nicol, T. Payne, G. and J. Robinson, W. Lowndes, G. Wilkie, J. Mathews, P. McQueen, Ogilvy and Son, J. Scatcherd, J. Walker, Vernor and Hood, R. Lea, Darton and Harvey, J. Nunn, Lackington and Company, D. Walker, Clarke and Son, G. Kearsley, C. Law, J. White, Longman and Rees, Cadell, Jun. and Davies, J. Barker, T. Kay, Wynne and Company, Pote and Company, Carpenter and Company, W. Miller, Murray and Highley, S. Bagster, T. Hurst, T. Boosey, R. Pheney, W. Baynes, J. Harding, R. H. Evans, J. Mawman; and W. Creech, Edinburgh, 1802 - English essays
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Page 186 - deceive, betray, Then as repentant to submit, beseech, And reconcilement move with feign'd remorse, Confess and promise wonders in her change; Not truly penitent, but chief to try Her husband, how far urg'd his patience bears, His virtue or weakness which way to assail: Then with more cautious and instructed skill Again transgresses, and again submits. When
Page 205 - yet a child, ere yet a fool to fame, I lisp'd in numbers, for the numbers came. Believe me, reader, can say more Than many a braver marble can, Here lies a truly honest man. This plain floor,
Page 186 - of glory run, and race of shame ; And I shall shortly be with them that rest. The reply of Samson to the flattering Dalilah affords a just and striking description of the stratagems and allurements of feminine hypocrisy
Page 178 - There I am wont to sit when any chance Relieves me from my task of servile toil, Daily in the common prison else cnjoin'd me.— —O wherefore was my birth from Heav'n foretold Twice by an angel ? . —Why was my breeding
Page 181 - having prevailed on his guide to suffer him to lean against the main pillars of the theatrical edifice, tore down the roof upon the spectators and himself: Those two massy pillars, With horrible confusion, to and fro, He tugg'd, he shook, till down they came, and drew The whole roof after them, with burst of thunder, Upon the heads of all who s.it beneath
Page 284 - from clime to clime observant stray'd, Their manners noted, and their states survey'd, On stormy seas unnumber'd toils he bore, Safe with his friends to gain his natal shore : Vain toils ! their impious folly dar'd to prey On herds devoted to the god of day : The god vindictive
Page 185 - is not wholly without verbal quaintness : 1 a prisoner chain'd scarce freely draw The air imprison'd also, close and damp. From the sentiments we may properly descend to the consideration of the language, which, in imitation of the ancients, is through the whole dialogue remarkably simple and unadorned, seldom heightened by epithets, or varied by figures; yet sometimes
Page 187 - Yet with thy strength thou serv'st the Philistines. Sams- Not in their idol worship, but by labour Honest and lawful to deserve my food Of those who have me in their civil power. Chor. Where the heart joins not, outward acts defile not.
Page 262 - transacted in former times, is to continue always a child. If no use is made of the labours of past ages, the world must remain always in the infancy of knowledge. The discoveries of every man must terminate in his own advantage, and the studies of
Page 288 - The most useful medicines are often unpleasing to the taste. Those who are oppressed by their own reputation) will perhaps not be comforted by hearing that their cares are unnecessary. But the truth is, that no man is much regarded by the rest of the world.. He that considers how little he dwells upon the condition of others, will

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