The Gentleman's Magazine, Volumes 155-156 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
F. Jeffries, 1834 - Early English newspapers
0 Reviews
The "Gentleman's magazine" section is a digest of selections from the weekly press; the "(Trader's) monthly intelligencer" section consists of news (foreign and domestic), vital statistics, a register of the month's new publications, and a calendar of forthcoming trade fairs.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 193 - Go. tell the church it shows What's good, and doth no good : If church and court reply, Then give them both the lie. Tell potentates they live Acting by others' action, Not loved unless they give, Not strong but by a faction.
Page 358 - I HAVE observed, that a reader seldom peruses a book with pleasure, till he knows whether the writer of it be a black or a fair man, of a mild or choleric disposition, married or a bachelor, with other particulars of the like nature, that conduce very much to the right understanding of an author.
Page 588 - Philosophy, wisdom, and liberty, support each other ; he who will not reason, is a bigot ; he who cannot, is a fool ; and he who dares not, is a slave.
Page 24 - It is the fashion to underrate Horace Walpole, firstly, because he was a nobleman, and secondly, because he was a gentleman; but, to say nothing of the composition of his incomparable " Letters," and of the "Castle of Otranto," he is the "Ultimus Romanorum," the author of the " Mysterious Mother," a tragedy of the highest order, and riot a puling love-play.
Page 193 - Go, Soul, the body's guest, Upon a thankless arrant: Fear not to touch the best; The truth shall be thy warrant: Go, since I needs must die, And give the world the lie. Say to the court, it glows And shines like rotten wood; Say to the church it shows What's good, and doth no good: If church and court reply, Then give them both the lie. Tell potentates, they live Acting by others...
Page 150 - I do not believe, neither do I hear, that any officer escaped with his life, save only one Lieutenant, who, I hear, going to the Enemy said, That he was the only man that escaped of all the Garrison. The Enemy upon this were filled with much terror. And truly I believe this bitterness will save much effusion of blood, through the goodness of God.
Page 193 - Tell zeal it wants devotion, Tell love it is but lust, Tell time it is but motion, Tell flesh it is but dust ; And wish them not reply, For thou must give the lie. Tell age it daily wasteth ; Tell honour how it alters ; Tell beauty how she blasteth ; Tell favour how it falters : And as they shall reply, Give every one the lie.
Page 354 - You should have known Shelley', said Byron, 'to feel how much I must regret him. He was the most gentle, most amiable, and least worldly-minded person I ever met; full of delicacy, disinterested beyond all other men, and possessing a degree of genius, joined to a simplicity, as rare as it is admirable. He had formed to himself a beau ideal of all that is fine, high-minded, and noble, and he acted up to this ideal even to the very letter.
Page 166 - I have never entered into any controversy in defence of my philosophical opinions; I leave them to take their chance in the world. If they are right, truth and experience will support them ; if wrong, they ought to be refuted and rejected. Disputes are apt to sour one's temper, and disturb one's quiet. I have no private interest in the reception of my inventions by the world, having never made, nor proposed to make, the least profit by any of them.
Page 106 - Heap on more wood ! the wind is chill, But let it whistle as it will, We'll keep our Christmas merry still.

Bibliographic information