Ethnic Groups in Conflict, Updated Edition with a New Preface (Google eBook)

Front Cover
University of California Press, Mar 10, 2001 - Social Science - 715 pages
1 Review
Drawing material from dozens of divided societies, Donald L. Horowitz constructs his theory of ethnic conflict, relating ethnic affiliations to kinship and intergroup relations to the fear of domination. A groundbreaking work when it was published in 1985, the book remains an original and powerfully argued comparative analysis of one of the most important forces in the contemporary world.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

IV
3
V
55
VI
95
VII
141
VIII
185
IX
229
X
291
XI
333
XIV
443
XV
472
XVI
526
XVII
563
XVIII
601
XIX
653
XX
681
XXI
685

XII
365
XIII
396

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

Donald L. Horowitz is the James B. Duke Professor of Law and Political Science at Duke University. He is the author of The Courts and Social Policy (1977), winner of the Louis Brownlow Award of the National Academy of Public Administration; The Jurocracy (1977), a book about government lawyers; Coup Theories and Officers' Motives: Sri Lanka in Comparative Perspective (1980); Ethnic Groups in Conflict (1985, 2000); A Democratic South Africa? Constitutional Engineering in a Divided Society (1991), winner of the Ralph Bunche Award of the American Political Science Association; and The Deadly Ethnic Riot (2001). Horowitz has been a visiting professor at the University of Chicago Law School and the Central European University as well as a visiting fellow at Wolfson College, Cambridge, at the Law Faculty of the University of Canterbury in New Zealand and at Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. In 2001, he was Centennial Professor at the London School of Economics and in 2001 2002, he was a Carnegie Scholar. In 2009, he was presented with the Distinguished Scholar Award of the Ethnicity, Nationalism and Migration Section of the International Studies Association. Horowitz is currently writing a book about constitutional design, particularly for divided societies, a subject on which he has advised in a number of countries. In 2010 11, he was a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center. In 2011 12, he was a Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow at the US Institute of Peace and in 2013, he will be a fellow of the American Academy in Berlin. Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1993, he served as president of the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy from 2007 to 2010. In 2011, Horowitz was awarded an honorary doctoral degree by the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, the Flemish-speaking Free University of Brussels.

Bibliographic information