The Daguerreotype, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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J. M. Whittemore, 1849
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Contains an interesting article, "Hunting in Western Texas, on Texas and San Antonio from the viewpoint of an 1843 traveler.

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Page 273 - As to the poetical character itself (I mean that sort, of which, if I am anything, I am a member; that sort distinguished from the Wordsworthian, or egotistical Sublime ; which is a thing per se, and stands alone...
Page 273 - A poet is the most unpoetical of anything in existence, because he has no identity ; he is continually in for, and filling, some other body. The sun, the moon, the sea, and men and women, who are creatures of impulse, are poetical, and have about them an unchangeable attribute ; the poet has none, no identity. He is certainly the most unpoetical of all God's creatures.
Page 273 - A poet is the most unpoetical of any thing in existence, because he has no Identity — he is continually in for and filling some other Body — The Sun, the Moon, the Sea and Men and Women, who are creatures of impulse, are poetical, and have about them an unchangeable attribute; the poet has none, no identity — he is certainly the most unpoetical of all God's Creatures.
Page 307 - ... trees ; Bright volumes of vapour through Lothbury glide, And a river flows on through the vale of Cheapside. Green pastures she views in the midst of the dale, Down which she so often has tripped with her pail ; And a single small Cottage, a nest like a dove's, The one only dwelling on earth that she loves. She looks, and her heart is in heaven : but they fade, The mist and the river, the hill and the shade : The stream will not flow, and the hill will not rise, And the colours have all passed...
Page 468 - CANST thou draw out leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down? Canst thou put an hook into his nose? or bore his jaw through with a thorn?
Page 272 - Castle of indolence. My passions are all asleep from my having slumbered till nearly eleven and weakened the animal fibre all over me to a delightful sensation about three degrees on this side of faintness— if I had teeth of pearl and the breath of lillies I should call it langour— but as I am * I must call it Laziness.
Page 327 - When we could endure no more upon the water, we to a little ale-house on the Bankside, over against the Three Cranes, and there staid till it was dark almost, and saw the fire grow; and, as it grew darker, appeared more and more, and in corners and upon steeples, and between churches and houses as far as we could see up the hill of the City,, in a most horrid malicious bloody flame, not like the fine flame of an ordinary fire.
Page 46 - PRINCIPLES OF ZOOLOGY; Touching the Structure, Development, Distribution, and Natural Arrangement, of the RACES OF ANIMALS, living and extinct, with numerous Illustrations. For the use of Schools and Colleges. Part I. COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. By Louis AGASSIZ and AUGUSTUS A. GOULD. Revised edition.
Page 273 - ... it has no self — it is every thing and nothing — It has no character — it enjoys light and shade; it lives in gusto, be it foul or fair, high or low, rich or poor, mean or elevated — it has as much delight in conceiving an lago as an Imogen.
Page 327 - Lord, what can I do? I am spent: people will not obey me. I have been pulling down houses; but the fire overtakes us faster than we can do it.

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