An ecclesiastical history of Great Britain, chiefly of England: from the first planting of Christianity, to the end of the reign of King Charles the Second; with a brief account of the affairs of religion in Ireland (Google eBook)

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W. Straker, 1840 - Great Britain
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Page 225 - And they are informed of thee, that thou teachest all the Jews which are among the Gentiles to forsake Moses, saying that they ought not to circumcise their children, neither to walk after the customs.
Page 423 - Bring ye all the tithes into the storehouse, that there may be meat in mine house, and prove me now herewith, saith the Lord of hosts, if I will not open you the windows of heaven and pour you out a blessing, that there shall not be room enough to receive it.
Page 484 - Moreover, brethren, I would not that ye should be ignorant, how that all our fathers were under the cloud, and all passed through the sea ; and were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea...
Page 534 - And graciously hear us, that those evils, which the craft and subtilty of the devil or man worketh against us, be brought to nought; and by the providence of thy goodness they may be dispersed ; that we thy servants, being hurt by no persecutions, may evermore give thanks unto thee in thy holy Church ; through Jesus Christ, our Lord.
Page 484 - Epistle. 1 Cor. x. 1. BRETHREN, I would not that ye should be ignorant, how that all our fathers were under the cloud, and all passed through the sea ; and were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud, and in the sea ; and did all eat the same spiritual meat, and did all drink the same spiritual drink ; (for they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them ; and that Rock was CHRIST.) But with many of them GOD was not well pleased; for they were overthrown in the wilderness.
Page xxx - Collier, because in many things he has taxed me justly; and I have pleaded guilty to all thoughts and expressions of mine, which can be truly argued of obscenity, profaneness, or immorality, and retract them. If he be my enemy, let him triumph ; if he be my friend, as I have given him no personal occasion to be otherwise, he will be glad of my repentance. It becomes me not to draw my pen in the defence of a bad cause, when I have so often drawn it for a good one.
Page xx - Order for the Visitation of the Sick, the priest is thus instructed : ' Here shall the sick person be moved to make a special confession of his sins if he find his conscience troubled with any weighty matter.
Page 193 - They that make them are like unto them ; and so are all such as put their trust in them.
Page xxxi - Country, than in all ours together. Yet this has been often acted on the stage in my remembrance.
Page 120 - And in that day did the Lord God of hosts call to weeping, and to mourning, and to baldness, and to girding with sackcloth : and behold joy and gladness, slaying oxen, and killing sheep, eating flesh, and drinking wine : let us eat and drink ; for to-morrow we shall die.

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