Progress without people: in defense of Luddism

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Charles H. Kerr Publishing Co., 1993 - History - 145 pages
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Cultural Writing. Labor History. In this ground-breaking study, newly available from Charles H. Kerr, scientific historian David F. Noble draws valuable parallels between our era of burgeoning technology and the technological advances of the industrial revolution. Proponents of technology during both eras, says Noble, argued that technological advancement was an essential, unstoppable force that would be inherently beneficial to humanity. Noble's counter-argument looks at the human costs of unchecked technological growth, along the way re-examining and redefining the meaning of Luddism.

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Contents

IN DEFENSE OF LUDDISM
1
Part
53
Automation Madness
59
Copyright

5 other sections not shown

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About the author (1993)

David F. Noble teaches history at York University in Toronto. His previous books include "America by Design", "Forces of Production", and "The Religion of Technology".