The History of England from the Accession of James II, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1889 - Great Britain
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Page 1 - I purpose to write the history of England from the accession of King James the Second down to a time which is within the memory of men still living.
Page 168 - The Puritan hated bearbaiting, not because it gave pain to the bear, but because it gave pleasure to the spectators.
Page 383 - One group debated whether Paradise Lost ought not to have been in rhyme. To another an envious poetaster demonstrated that Venice Preserved ought to have been hooted from the stage.
Page 49 - ... barbarism, have been turned by skill and industry into gardens, and can boast of a long list of heroes and statesmen, philosophers and poets. Whoever, knowing what Italy and Scotland naturally are, and what, four hundred years ago, they actually were, shall now compare the country round Rome with the country round Edinburgh, will be able to form some judgment as to the tendency of Papal domination.
Page 375 - The houses were not numbered. There would indeed have been little advantage in numbering them ; for of the coachmen, chairmen,^ porters, and errand boys of London, a very small proportion could read. It was necessary to use marks which the most ignorant could understand. The shops were therefore distinguished by painted or sculptured signs, which gave a gay and grotesque aspect to the streets. The walk from Charing Cross to Whitechapel lay through an endless succession of Saracens...
Page 393 - This mode of travelling, which by Englishmen of the present day would be regarded as insufferably slow, seemed to our ancestors wonderfully and indeed alarmingly rapid. In a work published a few months before the death of Charles the Second, the flying coaches are extolled as far superior to any similar vehicles ever known in the world.
Page 50 - ... Protestant activity and enterprise. The French have doubtless shown an energy and an intelligence which, even when misdirected, have justly entitled them to be called a great people. But this apparent exception, when examined, will be found to confirm the rule ; for in no country that is called Roman Catholic has the Roman Catholic Church, during several generations, possessed so little authority as in France.
Page 412 - Paris shone forth with a splendour which was set off' to full advantage by contrast. France, indeed, had at that time an empire over mankind, such as even the Roman Republic never attained. For, when Rome was politically dominant, she was in arts and letters the humble pupil of Greece. France had, over the surrounding countries, at once the ascendency which Rome had over Greece, and the ascendency which Greece had over Rome.
Page 435 - It may here be noticed that the practice of setting children prematurely to work, a practice which the state, the legitimate protector of those who cannot protect themselves, has, in our time, wisely and humanely interdicted, prevailed in the -seventeenth century to an extent which, when compared with the extent of the manufacturing system, seems almost incredible.
Page 160 - The troops were now to be disbanded. Fifty thousand men, accustomed to the profession of arms, were at once thrown on the world ; and experience seemed to warrant the belief that this change would produce much misery and crime that the discharged veterans would be seen begging in every street, or would be driven by hunger to pillage.

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