Scenes from the Rejected Comedies: By Some of the Competitors for the Prize of £500, Offered by Mr. B. Webster, Lessee of the Haymarket Theatre, for the Best Original Comedy, Illustrative of English Manners (Google eBook)

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At the Punch office, 1844 - 46 pages
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Page 28 - Antiquity," which Gray in his Ode on Eton College, has very properly attributed to its "towers." The rich practical joking which contributed so much to the success of " London Assurance," lias been introduced here with good effect, and the top of the gas lamp being larger than the knockers brought in by the hero of his former play, proves that the author's ideas have greatly expanded since he first burst upon the public as one of that almost extinct species — the writer of a successful Five Act...
Page 10 - THE comedy from which the following scene is taken, like many of the works of its author, is very severe upon the lawyers, and the dramatist in his desire to lash makes the attorney — his principal character — occasionally lash himself with extraordinary bitterness. This the author would, no doubt, defend, by asserting that it is in the nature of the scorpion to dart his sting into his own back ; at least such may be his excuse if he thinks a scorpion black enough and venomous enough to bear...
Page 35 - SENSIBILITY," AND OTHER MS. DRAMAS. THE extreme conciseness of this gentleman's style enables us to print his Comedy entire ; and when we see the wide range of subjects it embraces ; the rough honesty of the tar ; the recklessness of the libertine lord ; the abiding endurance of the patient girl ; the affectionate bluffness of the admiral her father; the merry promptness of the coxswain to indulge in one of those hornpipes which constitute the distinctive character of the British...
Page 43 - I didn't sneer at him, Cicely. I only said his twist was a tolerably voracious one. Enter SHARPSHOES and GRANDMOTHER BROWNWIG. Grandmother B. Hi ! hi ! Ah ! ah ! Let me see ; that was fifty-seven years ago last Candlemas. I remember it very well ; because on that day I lent Master Sparrowgrass — no, it wasn't Master Sparrowgrass neither ; it must have been old Dame Fortyman. Sharpshoes. Well, now, never mind Master Sparrowgrass ; you asked me to dinner, Mrs. Brownwig, and though I Ve taken off...
Page 18 - Borne is to the Punjaub. * Honoria, I must own you are rather gauche. But I will make Thalberg tell me all about it when he comes to give me my lecon de musique. He has seen those odious Bohemians dancing it all over their horrid country. Dashington. What a dreadful infliction ! By-the-by, is not Thalberg the fellow who nearly frightened me into fits, by * San Giovanni di Laterano is one of the churches of the Eternal City, as Rome is frequently called. — ( Vide " Pinnacle's Catechism of Modern...
Page 40 - ... Behold your work ! (points to EMILY, who suddenly recovers. HERBERT rushes into her arms ; both scream with joy. The ADMIRAL begins to dance, and sings snatches of an old naval song). Lord T. Well, I'm at sea. Ton honour ! I came to relinquish my claims to Miss Emily's hand. Herbert. Did you, my Lord ? Then take mine ; and the Peer need never be ashamed to grasp in friendship the hand of the honest seaman. Admiral. Hollo there ! Not so fast. Haul in your yard-arms a little bit. Am I not to be...
Page 46 - They rusk into each other's arms, and the Servant bows and retires.] Stavely. How are you, Wentworth, my old companion at Eton, my chum at college, and my friend everywhere ? Wentworth. And, indeed, your friend has been almost everywhere since he saw you last. Stavely. Sit down, my good fellow, and tell me all about it. Stokes ! (enter Servant), some claret. [Exit Servant. [They draw their chairs to the front of the stage, and sit. Wentworth. Well, Stavely, since I last dined with you at the Club,...
Page 14 - ... raised an altar to her in the Court of Common Pleas, and allowed the brain of the poet to burst out from beneath the coif of the Serjeant. It is to be regretted, that, as somebody is said to have said of somebody else, he gave to parties what was meant for mankind. The Author of " Ion,"by failing to carry off Mr. Webster's prize — a result that his necessary attention to his profession has, no doubt, occasioned — must be considered to have given to Westminster Hall what was meant for the...
Page 41 - Lord T. And say not a word about THE TILBURY. GRANDMOTHER BROWNWIG. BY M— KL N. AUTHOR OF " GRANDFATHER WHITEHEAD." THIS gentleman, with a highly creditable respect for age, has given dramatic vitality to " Grandfather Whitehead " and " Old Parr," whose name will go down to posterity in connection with the
Page 39 - ... be accompanied with the sting of the wasp or the venom of the adder ; and he shall find that generosity, like a thing mislaid, is often found where we least expected to discover it. \Exit. ACT THE FIFTH. SCENE — A Ball-room. Guests dancing, Servants handing round refreshments. EMILY at the window looking earnestly through a telescope. Emily (coming forward.) How these odious sounds of gaiety afflict my heart. What is wealth ? — a bauble, that we have to-day, and find flown to-morrow. —...

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