Proclus: An Introduction

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 26, 2012 - History - 328 pages
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Proclus of Lycia (412-485) was one of the greatest philosophers of antiquity, producing the most systematic version of late Neoplatonic thought. He exercised enormous influence on Byzantine, medieval, Renaissance and German Classical philosophy, ranking among the top five of ancient philosophers in terms of the number of preserved works. Despite this he is rarely studied now, the enormous intricacy of his system making the reading of his treatises difficult for beginners. This book provides the first comprehensive introduction to all the basic areas of Proclus' thought. It carefully guides the reader through his metaphysics, theology, epistemology and theory of evil, as well as his sophisticated philosophy of religion. It also sets Proclus in the historical, social and religious context of late antiquity, offering a synthetic account that will appeal to historians and students of ancient religion.
  

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This is an admirably clear and well-balanced account of a pretty difficult philosopher, by a young Czech scholar who has mastered the subject remarkably well. There has been no general study of Proclus in English, really, since Rosán back in 1949, so this fills a considerable gap.

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Contents

Introduction
1
chapter 1 Historical background
9
chapter 2 Proclus metaphysics
47
chapter 3 Proclus polytheistic theology
112
chapter 4 Epistemology
137
chapter 5 Ways of unification
163
chapter 6 Inspired poetry and its symbols
185
chapter 7 Evil and theodicy
201
chapter 8 Ethics
234
chapter 9 Worldview
255
Proclus legacy
279
Bibliography
295
Index
312
Index
317
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About the author (2012)

Radek Chlup is a lecturer at the Institute for Philosophy and Religious Studies at the Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague. He specializes in Greek philosophy and religion as well as in general methodology for the study of religion.

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