The Mexican War: A History of Its Origin, and a Detailed Account of the Victories which Terminated in the Surrender of the Capital; with the Official Despatches of the Generals. To which is Added, the Treaty of Peace, and Valuable Tables of the Strength and Losses of the United States Army (Google eBook)

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A.S. Barnes & Company, 1849 - Mexican War, 1846-1848 - 365 pages
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Page 337 - Those who shall prefer to remain in the said territories, may either retain the title and rights of Mexican citizens, or acquire those of citizens of the United States. But they shall be under the obligation to make their election within one year from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this treaty ; and those who shall remain in the said territories after the expiration of that year, without having declared their intention to retain the character of Mexicans, shall be considered to have...
Page 337 - ... Union of the United States, and be admitted at the proper time (to be judged of by the Congress of the United States) to the enjoyment of all the rights of citizens of the United States...
Page 335 - In order to designate the boundary line with due precision, upon authoritative maps, and to establish upon the ground landmarks which shall show the limits of both republics, as described in the present article, the two governments shall each appoint a commissioner and a surveyor, who, before the expiration of one year from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this treaty, shall meet at the port of San Diego, and proceed to run and mark the said boundary in its whole course to the mouth of...
Page 343 - ... by the arbitration of commissioners appointed on each side, or by that of a friendly nation. And should such course be proposed by either party it shall be acceded to by the other unless deemed by it altogether incompatible with the nature of the difference or the circumstances of the case.
Page 345 - General Congress; and the ratifications shall be exchanged in the city of "Washington, or at the seat of government of Mexico, in four months from the date of the signature hereof, or sooner if practicable. In faith whereof, we, the respective plenipotentiaries, have signed this treaty of peace, friendship, limits, and settlement; and have hereunto affixed our seals respectively. Done in...
Page 333 - Houses at all ports occupied by the forces of the United States, requiring them (under the same condition) immediately to deliver possession of the same to the persons authorized by the Mexican Government to receive it, together with all bonds and evidences of debt for duties on importations and on exportations, not yet fallen due.
Page 336 - Boundary in its whole course to the mouth of the Rio Bravo del Norte. They shall keep journals and make out plans of their operations; and the result agreed upon by them shall be deemed a part of this treaty, and shall have the same force as if it were inserted therein. The two Governments will amicably agree regarding what may be necessary to these persons, and also as to their respective escorts, should such be necessary.
Page 338 - Mexico would be prejudicial in the extreme, it is solemnly agreed that all such incursions shall be forcibly restrained by the government of the United States whensoever this may be necessary ; and that when they cannot be prevented, they shall be punished by the said government, and satisfaction for the same shall be exacted — all in the same way. and with equal diligence and energy, as if the same incursions were meditated or committed within its own territory against its own citizens.
Page 345 - And it is declared that neither the pretence that war dissolves all treaties, nor any other whatever, shall be considered as annulling or suspending the solemn covenant contained in this article. On the contrary, the state of war is precisely that for which it is provided ; and during which its stipulations are to be as sacredly observed as the most acknowledged obligations under the law of nature or nations.
Page 342 - The owners of all merchandise, effects, or property described in the first and second rules, and existing in any port of Mexico, shall have the right to re-ship the same, exempt from all tax, impost, or contribution whatever. With respect to the metals, or other property, exported from any Mexican port whilst in the occupation of the forces of the United States...

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