Keeping it Living: Traditions of Plant Use and Cultivation on the Northwest Coast of North America

Front Cover
Douglas Deur, Nancy J. Turner
University of Washington Press, Jan 1, 2005 - Indians of North America - 404 pages
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Keeping It Living brings together some of the world’smost prominent specialists on Northwest Coast cultures to examinetraditional cultivation practices from Oregon to Southeast Alaska. Itexplores tobacco gardens among the Haida and Tlingit, managed camasplots among the Coast Salish of Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia,estuarine root gardens along the central coast of British Columbia,wapato maintenance on the Columbia and Fraser Rivers, and tended berryplots up and down the entire coast.

With contributions from a host of experts, Native American scholarsand elders, Keeping It Living documents practices ofmanipulating plants and their environments in ways that enhancedculturally preferred plants and plant communities. It describes howindigenous peoples of this region used and cared for over 300 speciesof plants, from the lofty red cedar to diminutive plants of backwaterbogs.

  

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Contents

PART II Case Studies
179
PART III Conclusions
329
Bibliography
343
Contributors
379
Index
381
Copyright

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References to this book

Sacred Ecology
Fikret Berkes
No preview available - 2008

About the author (2005)

Douglas Deur is research coordinator with the Pacific Northwest Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit at the University of Washington and adjunct professor of geography at the University of Nevada, Reno. Nancy J. Turner is distinguished professor in environmental studies and geography at the University of Victoria. The other contributors include Kenneth M. Ames, E. Richard Atleo (Umeek), Melissa Darby, Douglas Hallett, James T. Jones, Dana Lepofsky, Ken Lertzman, Rolf Mathewes, James McDonald, Albert (Sonny) McHalsie, Madonna L. Moss, Sandra Peacock, Bruce D. Smith, Robin Smith, Wayne Suttles, and Kevin Washbrook.

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