Our Western Border: Its Life, Combats, Adventures, Forays, Massacres, Captivities, Scouts, Red Chiefs, Pioneer Women, One Hundred Years Ago ... (Google eBook)

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J.C. McCurdy & Company, 1875 - Frontier and pioneer life - 756 pages
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Page 170 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it; I have killed many ; I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 170 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat, if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not.
Page 239 - Several of our young people were formerly brought up at the colleges of the Northern Provinces; they were instructed in all your Sciences; but, when they came back to us, they were bad runners, ignorant of every means of living in the woods, unable to bear either cold or hunger, knew neither how to build a cabin, take a deer, or kill an enemy, spoke our language imperfectly, were therefore neither fit for hunters, warriors, nor counsellors; they were totally good for nothing.
Page 21 - This was a whole day's work, we next got it launched then went on board of it and set off. But before we were half way over we were jammed in the ice in such a manner that we expected every moment our raft to sink and ourselves to perish.
Page 644 - Fork, and were ascending in a canoe, when they suddenly heard a great noise, resembling the trampling of animals; but they could not ascertain the fact, as the high perpendicular banks on each side of the river impeded their view. Colter immediately pronounced it to be occasioned by Indians, and advised an instant retreat, but was accused of cowardice by Potts, who insisted that the noise was caused by buffaloes, and they proceeded on.
Page 751 - Squaw, which he like, he go to him, place his two forefingers close aside each other, make two look like one — look Squaw in the face — see him smile — which is all one he say, Yes! so he take him home — no danger he be cross! no! no ! Squaw know too well what Indian do if he cross! — throw him away and take another ! Squaw love to eat meat ! no husband ! no meat ! Squaw do every thing to please husband ! he do the same to please Squaw ! live happy ! " 1 The pronouns in the Indian language...
Page 639 - ... sleep for pain, he would watch over us. You may suppose we slept much less than we talked. The two strangers gave me an account of their once having been themselves in a somewhat similar situation. Day came, fair and rosy, and with it the punishment of our captives. They were now quite sobered. Their feet were unbound, but their arms were still securely tied. We marched them into the woods off the road, and having used them as Regulators were wont to use such delinquents, we set fire to the cabin,...
Page 171 - Captain Cresap, — What did you kill my people on Yellow Creek for? The white people killed my kin at Conestoga, a great while ago; and I thought nothing of that. But you killed my kin again, on Yellow Creek, and took my Cousin Prisoner. Then I thought I mast kill too; and I have been three times to war since; but the Indians are not angry; only myself.
Page 20 - We took this fellow into custody, and kept him until about nine o'clock at night, then let him go, and walked all the remaining part of the night without making any stop, that we might get the start so far as to be out of the reach of their pursuit the next day, since we were well assured they would follow our track as soon as it was light.
Page 494 - GENTLEMEN* : Being now within two miles of your village with my army, determined to take your fort this night, and not being willing to surprise you, I take this method to request such of you as are true citizens, and willing to enjoy the liberty I bring you, to remain still in your houses. And those, if any there be, that are friends to the king, •will instantly repair to the fort and join the hairbuyer general, and fight like men.

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