Researches Into the History of the British Dog: From Ancient Laws, Charters, and Historical Records : with Original Anecdotes, and Illustrations of the Nature and Attributes of the Dog, from the Poets and Prose Writers of Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern Times, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Robert Hardwicke, 1866 - Dogs
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Page 14 - Where slaves once more their native land behold, No fiends torment, no Christians thirst for gold. To Be, contents his natural desire, He asks no Angel's wing, no Seraph's fire; But thinks, admitted to that equal sky, His faithful dog shall bear him company.
Page 14 - Lo, the poor Indian ! whose untutor'd mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind; His soul, proud science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk, or milky way...
Page 76 - Good people all of every sort, Give ear unto my song, And if you find it wondrous short It cannot hold you long. In Islington there was a man, Of whom the world might say, That still a godly race he ran Whene'er he went to pray. A kind and gentle heart he had, To comfort friends and foes ; The naked every day he clad, When he put on his clothes.
Page 25 - Near this spot Are deposited the Remains Of one Who Possessed Beauty Without Vanity, Strength without Insolence, Courage without Ferocity, And all the Virtues of Man Without his Vices. This Praise, which would be unmeaning flattery If inscribed over Human Ashes, Is but a just tribute to the Memory of "Boatswain," a Dog Who was born at Newfoundland, May, 1803, And died at Newstead Abbey Nov. 18, 1808.
Page 18 - With something as the shepherd thinks, Unusual in its cry: Nor is there any one in sight All round, in hollow or on height; Nor shout, nor whistle strikes his ear; What is the creature doing here ? It was a cove, a huge recess, That keeps, till June, December's snow; A lofty precipice in front, A silent tarn below!
Page 16 - Nor yet quite deserted, though lonely extended, For, faithful in death, his mute favourite attended, The much-loved remains of her master defended, And chased the hill-fox and the raven away. How long didst thou think that his silence was slumber ? When the wind waved his garment, how oft didst thou start?
Page 271 - I have observed among all nations that the women ornament themselves more than the men ; that, wherever found, they are the same kind, civil, obliging, humane, tender beings ; that they are ever inclined to be gay and cheerful, timorous, and modest...
Page 61 - And if one or two quick tears Dropped upon his glossy ears Or a sigh came double, Up he sprang in eager haste, Fawning, fondling, breathing fast, In a tender trouble.
Page 18 - This lamentable tale I tell ! A lasting monument of words This wonder merits well. The Dog, which still was hovering nigh, Repeating the same timid cry, This Dog had been through three months' space A dweller in that savage place.
Page 61 - Other dogs in thymy dew Tracked the hares and followed through Sunny moor or meadow ; This dog only, crept and crept Next a languid cheek that slept, Sharing in the shadow.

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