The British Essayists: The Observer (Google eBook)

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J. Johnson, J. Nichols and Son, R. Baldwin, F. and C. Rivington, W. Otridge and Son, W. J. and J. Richardson, A. Strahan, J. Sewell, R. Faulder, G. and W. Nicol, T. Payne, G. and J. Robinson, W. Lowndes, G. Wilkie, J. Mathews, P. McQueen, Ogilvy and Son, J. Scatcherd, J. Walker, Vernor and Hood, R. Lea, Darton and Harvey, J. Nunn, Lackington and Company, D. Walker, Clarke and Son, G. Kearsley, C. Law, J. White, Longman and Rees, Cadell, Jun. and Davies, J. Barker, T. Kay, Wynne and Company, Pote and Company, Carpenter and Company, W. Miller, Murray and Highley, S. Bagster, T. Hurst, T. Boosey, R. Pheney, W. Baynes, J. Harding, R. H. Evans, J. Mawman; and W. Creech, Edinburgh, 1802 - English essays
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Page 10 - As a writer, he is entitled to one praise of the highest kind ; his mode of thinking, and of expressing his thoughts, is original. His blank verse is no more the blank verse of Milton, or of any other poet, than the rhymes of Prior are the rhymes of Cowley. His numbers, his pauses, his diction, are of his own growth, without transcription, without imitation. He thinks in a peculiar train, and he thinks always as a man of genius...
Page 40 - In like manner having recourse to devotion, in a spirit of rational piety, he solicits the aid of Heaven to render him virtuous. He personifies Virtue ; places her in a triumphal car, attended by a suitable train ; one of her attendants, a female distinguished by high pre-eminence, must also be distinguished by superior beauty...
Page 41 - d the sacred leaves of gold. Let me with holy awe repair, To the solemn house of prayer. And as I go, O thou ! my heart, Forget each low and earthly part. Religion enter in my breast, A mild and venerable guest ! Put off in Contemplation drown'd, Each thought impure in holy ground, And cautious tread with awful fear The courts of Heav'n ; for God is here.
Page 37 - ... repose; Or where some holy, aged oak, A stranger to the woodman's stroke, From the high rock's aerial crown, In twisting arches bending down, Bathes in the smooth pellucid stream, Full oft he waits the mystic dream Of mankind's joys right understood, And of the all-prevailing good.
Page 172 - Albert advanced to the rank of a lieutenant in the army, to which his valour and merit had raised him, married to a lady by whom he had got some little fortune, and the father of an only daughter, for whom nature had done much, and to whose native endowments it was the chief study and delight of her parents to add every thing that art could bestow. The gratitude of the chief was only equalled by the happiness of his follower, whose honest pride was not long after gratified by his daughter's becoming...
Page 170 - ... with others who had escaped the slaughter of the field, sheltered themselves from the rage of the unsparing soldiery, among the distant recesses of their country. To him his native mountains offered an asylum ; and thither he naturally fled for protection. Acquainted, in the pursuits of the...
Page 183 - Stava ben, ma bfv star mcgliot sto qui. found my system, which was to enjoy the present, was totally inconsistent with those provident plans she had formed in the view of a variety of future contingencies, which, if but barely possible, she looks upon as absolutely certain. The prospect of an increase to our family (though we have now lived five years together, without the...
Page 7 - A god impels the winds. A god pours out the rivers. Grapes are the gift of Bacchus. Ceres presides over the harvest. Orchards are the care of Pomona. Does a shepherd sound his reed on the summit of a mountain, it is Pan, who, with his pastoral pipe, returns the amorous lay. When the...
Page 170 - Sometimes shame and indignation well nigh overcame my fear, and I have prepared to rush down the steep, unarmed as I was, and to die at once by the swords of my enemies ; but the instinctive love of life prevailed, and starting as the roe bounded by me, I have again shrunk back to the shelter I had left.
Page 167 - ... self-complacency which I am vain enough to think a bad man would be incapable of feeling. It appears to me a very pernicious mistake, which I have sometimes seen parents guilty of in the education of their children, to encourage and incite in them...

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