The Earth and Its Inhabitants: Africa (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton, 1886 - Africa
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Page 466 - Arab women generally, cultivate some fields of durra, or corn, sufficient for the wants of the tribe The Arab himself would consider it a disgrace to practise any manual labour. He is essentially a hunter, a robber, and a warrior, and, after caring for his cattle, devotes all his energies to slave-hunting and war.
Page 461 - The form and ornamental designs of their utensils display real artistic taste, while the temper of their iron-implements is often superior to that of the imported European hardware. Here again the observation has been made, that the tribes most addicted to cannibalism also excel in mental qualities and physical energy. Nor are they strangers to the finer feelings of human nature...
Page 432 - The valuable library of Alexandria was pillaged or destroyed; and near twenty years afterwards, the appearance of the empty shelves excited the regret and indignation of every spectator whose mind was not totally darkened by religious prejudice.
Page 470 - The Wa-Huma, to whom the attention of ethnologists has scarcely yet been seriously directed, present some points of great anthropological interest, probably affording a solution of the difficulties connected with the constituent elements of the Bantu races in East Central Africa. Speke had already observed that the chiefs of the Bantu nations about the great lakes were always "Wa-Huma, a pastoral people evidently of Galla stock, and originally immigrants from the Galla country. Since then it has...
Page 146 - ... consider their type similar to that of the eastern Jews ; but observers have generally failed to notice any striking difference in features between them and their neighbours, except perhaps that their eyes are a little more oblique than those of the Agau. Their language, the kuara, huara, or huaraza, said to be dying out, also resembles that of the Agau, and lends additional force to the hypothesis of the two peoples springing from a common stock. But their religious zeal connects them so closely...
Page 10 - Here the trade- winds maintain their normal direction constantly, or with but slight temporary deviations. Blowing from the NE. in the northern, from the SE. in the southern hemisphere, they divert to the equator most of the vapours crossing their path, leaving elsewhere clear skies and arid lands. Thus it happens that Africa has two almost completely barren zones of rocks, gravels, marls, clay, and sand — the Sahara and Libyan desert in the north, Kalahari and other wastes in the south. This...
Page 3 - ... expands to a breadth of 550 miles, terminating northwards in the Abyssinian highlands, a rocky citadel whose base exceeds those of all the other continental orographic systems. These Ethiopian heights stand over against those of Yemen, and like them are a remnant of the border range sweeping round the Indian and Pacific Oceans from the Cape of Good Hope to Cape Horn, and forming a vast semicircle of 24,000 miles, equal to the circumference of the globe. Although not yet thoroughly explored, Africa...
Page 432 - Serapis, without any other difficulties than those which he found in the weight and solidity of the materials; but these obstacles proved so insuperable that he was obliged to leave the foundations, and to content himself with reducing the edifice itself to a heap of rubbish, a part of which was soon afterwards cleared away, to make room for a church erected in honour of the Christian martyrs.
Page 472 - Strabo,22 and who from the third to the sixth century of the new era infested the southern frontiers of Egypt. Often defeated by Aurelian and Probus, they nevertheless so continued to harass these outlying provinces of the empire, that Diocletian was at last induced to withdraw the Roman garrisons from the...
Page 431 - The two parties assembled, without arms, in the principal square; and the Imperial rescript was publicly read. But, when a sentence of destruction against the idols of Alexandria was pronounced, the Christians...

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