Powers and Principles: International Leadership in a Shrinking World

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Michael Schiffer, David Shorr
Lexington Books, 2009 - Political Science - 367 pages
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What if the major global and regional powers of today s world came into closer alignment to build a stronger international community and shared approaches to twenty-first century threats and challenges? The Stanley Foundation posed that question to thirty-three top foreign policy analysts in Powers and Principles: International Leadership in a Shrinking World. Contributing writers were asked to describe the paths that nine powerful nations, a regional union of twenty-seven states, and a multinational corporation could take as constructive stakeholders in a strengthened rules-based international order. Each chapter is an assessment of what is politically possible (and impossible) with a description of the associated pressures and reference to the country s geostrategic position, economy, society, history, and political system and culture. To provide a perspective from the inside and counterweight, each essay is accompanied by a critical reaction by a prominent analyst commentator from the given country. Powers and Principles is aimed at both reflective practitioners of policy and policy-relevant scholars."
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Part 1 OLD GUARD
9
Redefining American Leadership
11
Leading or Losing the Way Toward Responsible Stakeholdership?
45
The Global Ambition of the European Project
73
Part 2 CHALLENGERS
97
Gill A Rising Chinas Rising Responsibilities
99
The Ultimate Test of FreeMarket Democracy
125
A Game of ThreeDimensional Chess
197
Almeida Brazils Candidacy for Major Power Status
225
Part 4 SQUARE PEGS
257
From Beacon of Hope to Rogue Democracy?
259
Maloney Refashioning Irans International Role
295
The Oil Majors
321
Index
349
About the Contributors
361

Calculations in the Kremlin
165
Part 3 BELLWETHERS
195

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About the author (2009)

Michael Schiffer was, from 2006-2009, a program officer in policy analysis and dialogue at the Stanley Foundation and a fellow at the Center for Asia and Pacific Studies at the University of Iowa.
David Shorr is a program officer at the Stanley Foundation. His last co-edited volume, a collection of bipartisan essays, was Bridging the Foreign Policy Divide.

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