Gulliver's Travels (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
17 Reviews
A parody of the traveler s tales literary genre and a satire of human nature, from the master of satire himself, Jonathan Swift, "Gulliver's Travels" is his best known and most loved work. The novel whose authorship is assigned to the central character, Lemuel Gulliver, is divided into four parts (Part I: A Voyage To Lilliput, Part II: A Voyage to Brobdingnag, Part III: A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibari, Glubbdubdrib, Luggnagg and Japan, and Part IV: A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms). A classic satirical tale "Gulliver's Travels" is a novel that will be enjoyed by readers both young and old.
  

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Review: Gulliver's Travels

User Review  - Christopher - Goodreads

Call me Robinson. As a renowned world traveller and shipwreckee, I have been drafted as an expert witness to investigate and report upon the veracity of the recorded histories of Mr. Lemuel Gulliver ... Read full review

Review: Gulliver's Travels

User Review  - Zoha Trabelsi - Goodreads

Absolutely brilliant!! Any sensitive reader will see in it more than a book for children, It's definitely a book for adults, Is full of delights, as discovering the most noble and perverse qualities ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
6
II
11
III
16
IV
20
V
23
VI
26
VII
32
VIII
36
XXI
90
XXII
94
XXIII
97
XXIV
99
XXV
102
XXVI
104
XXVII
109
XXVIII
111

IX
40
X
46
XI
49
XII
55
XIII
57
XIV
62
XV
67
XVI
70
XVII
77
XVIII
80
XIX
84
XX
87
XXIX
114
XXX
117
XXXI
120
XXXII
123
XXXIII
127
XXXIV
130
XXXV
134
XXXVI
137
XXXVII
140
XXXVIII
144
XXXIX
148
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Apparently doomed to an obscure Anglican parsonage in Laracor, Ireland, even after he had written his anonymous masterpiece, A Tale of a Tub (c.1696), Swift turned a political mission to England from the Irish Protestant clergy into an avenue to prominence as the chief propagandist for the Tory government. His exhilaration at achieving importance in his forties appears engagingly in his Journal to Stella (1710--13), addressed to Esther Johnson, a young protegee for whom Swift felt more warmth than for anyone else in his long life. At the death of Queen Anne and the fall of the Tories in 1714, Swift became dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin. In Ireland, which he considered exile from a life of power and intellectual activity in London, Swift found time to defend his oppressed compatriots, sometimes in such contraband essays as his Drapier's Letters (1724), and sometimes in such short mordant pieces as the famous A Modest Proposal (1729); and there he wrote perhaps the greatest work of his time, Gulliver's Travels (1726). Using his characteristic device of the persona (a developed and sometimes satirized narrator, such as the anonymous hack writer of A Tale of a Tub or Isaac Bickerstaff in Predictions for the Ensuing Year, who exposes an astrologer), Swift created the hero Gulliver, who in the first instance stands for the bluff, decent, average Englishman and in the second, humanity in general. Gulliver is a full and powerful vision of a human being in a world in which violent passions, intellectual pride, and external chaos can degrade him or her---to animalism, in Swift's most horrifying images---but in which humans do have scope to act, guided by the Classical-Christian tradition. Gulliver's Travels has been an immensely successful children's book (although Swift did not care much for children), so widely popular through the world for its imagination, wit, fun, freshness, vigor, and narrative skill that its hero is in many languages a common proper noun. Perhaps as a consequence, its meaning has been the subject of continuing dispute, and its author has been called everything from sentimental to mad. Swift died in Dublin and was buried next to his beloved "Stella.

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