Turning Numbers Into Knowledge: Mastering the Art of Problem Solving

Front Cover
Analytics Press, 2001 - Business & Economics - 221 pages
4 Reviews
Mastering the art of problem solving takes more than proficiency with basic calculations; it requires understanding how people use information, recognizing the importance of ideology, learning the art of storytelling, and acknowledging the important distinction between facts and values. Intended for professors, managers, entrepreneurs, and students, this guide addresses these and other essential skills. With clear prose, quotations, and exercises for solving problems in the real world, this book serves as an ideal training manual for those who are new to or intimidated by quantitative analysis and an excellent refresher for those who have more experience but want to improve the quality of their data, the clarity of their graphics, and the cogency of their arguments.

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Review: Turning Numbers into Knowledge: Mastering the Art of Problem Solving

User Review  - Nate - Goodreads

Koomey's book "Turning Numbers into Knowledge" is definitely far more concerned about the process of analyzing data and presenting data than it is about mastering the art of problem solving. That is ... Read full review

Review: Turning Numbers into Knowledge: Mastering the Art of Problem Solving

User Review  - John - Goodreads

Not a bad guide to writing good quantitative reports, and consuming other's reports in an intelligent way. I do wish it had more on statistics though. Read full review

Contents

BE PREPARED
29
part ill ASSESS THEIR ANALYSIS
57
Reading Tables and Graphs
84
Copyright

26 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

\Jonathan G. Koomey, PhD, is a staff scientist and group leader at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and serves on the editorial board of the Contemporary Economic Policy journal. He is the author of Energy Policy in the Greenhouse and has appeared on Nova, Frontline, NPR, the California Report, and Tech Nation. He lives in Oakland, California.

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