Cognitive Development: The Child's Acquisition of Diagonality

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Psychology Press, 1996 - Psychology - 220 pages
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When this book was first published, David Olson was examining the developing representation and use of diagonals in the context of much larger questions, questions also explored by Vygotsky, Cassirer, Gombrich, and Bruner. These include such issues as conceptual development, conceptual change, and stage-like transitions in one's knowledge and belief. Some of these problems remain at virtually the same stage of solution to this day. Other problems have indeed been solved or at least come closer to solution, leading the author to think about the precise cognitive representations that allowed for the cognitive growth he examined in such scrupulous detail.

The author hopes that both readers and re-readers of this volume will be led to wonder -- as he did while working on the book -- just what there is about a simple diagonal that makes its reproduction so difficult. In so doing, readers will again be reminded of the remarkable resources that children bring to bear on their understanding of the world as well as the blind spots that no simple telling can quite fill in.
  

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
9
Section 3
11
Section 4
18
Section 5
20
Section 6
24
Section 7
25
Section 8
26
Section 15
125
Section 16
132
Section 17
140
Section 18
142
Section 19
144
Section 20
147
Section 21
149
Section 22
150

Section 9
37
Section 10
41
Section 11
56
Section 12
76
Section 13
96
Section 14
109
Section 23
158
Section 24
163
Section 25
172
Section 26
173
Section 27
183

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About the author (1996)

Olson is University Professor and Professor of Applied Cognitive Science at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto.

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