A treatise on modern horology in theory and practice (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Crosby Lockwood, 1887 - Antiques & Collectibles - 844 pages
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Contents

Different kinds of friction
46
Tabular Summary of general mechanical principles
52
Proportions adopted by Thiout Berthoud Tavan Moinet and Wagner
62
Recapitulation Table of dimensions
73
The npeninsr of the pallets The lift Supplementary arc Recoil Inclina
78
The balance Balancespring To mark the lifting points
82
CYLINDER ESCAPEMENT
94
Table of proportions Observations and summary of chapter
112
Theoretical and experimental proof of propositions
119
Ratio of length of escapement arm to impelling force
127
Sixth and seventh experiments 133
133
Influence of a change in dimensions of moderator
139
Rules for constructing the cylinder escapement
145
Three experiments Concluding remarks on the straight incline
153
Height of impulse curve lift and tangential escaping
161
Lift and height of incline in small and large watches
169
Experiments on different openings etc and concluding observations 176
176
Experiments with elastic laminaa
182
Summary of the three main elements of timing 18
189
Tabular summary Notes and practical details
198
To design a cylinder escapement
201
Practical details concerning the cylinder in steel and ruby
209
Cylinder too large or too small To verify and adjust the drops
215
the balance
221
To mark lifting points and fix balance springstud 22ft
229
To rapidly time a cylinder watch Vibration counter
236
Construction of a cylinder escapement 258
258
To make the escapewheel Hardening trueing c Tools
273
Pivoting and setting in position
287
DUPLEX ESCAPEMENT
297
Table of the proportions adopted by these different authorities and observations
304
Great lift Length of impulse pallet Diameters of wheels 310
310
Position of impulse tooth Small lift Pitch of resting tooth in roller notch 316
316
Practical details To trace out the calliper 323
323
Pivots and pivotholes Details on the balancespring
329
To verify the escapement Observations Timing in position
335
Concluding observations 345
345
Breguets ruby cylinder escapement
351
Propositions summarizing theory of detached escapements
357
Three experiments
362
Plane that secures minimum resistance with requisite stability
371
Effect of impulse varies with height of incline Changes in the moderator
377
Four experiments
383
Concluding observations Summary of the propositions The lift Drop
390
Proportions adopted by Tavan Jurgensen Moinet
397
Principles of construction General considerations
399
To determine the draw or recoil
403
Height of impulse plane Apparent and real lift
409
Distance between centres of balance and escapewheel Long and short levers
418
Breadth of pallets and teeth Their acting faces
424
The draw Lifting angle Lead Form of teeth
498
On advancing the lockingstone by one tooth Impulse roller Unlocking
507
Why was Arnolds detent abandoned?
513
Breguets escapement with natural lifts
520
Preliminary Deadbeat and recoil escapements
527
Berthouds experiments on the two classes of escapements
543
Rozes recoil anchor escapement
549
Recoil Brocot escapement with two wheels
557
Vulliamys Winnerls anchor escapements
569
Vulliamys pin escapement with movable arms
575
Supplementary arc length of cratch choice of a pendulum
580
The bent lever Engaging and disengaging friction
587
To calculate velocities in a train of wheels Revolutions of the escapewheel
595
Relation of lifting angle to length of pendulum
597
Calculation of the force transmitted by a train of wheels 699
603
Reason for rounding the point of a pinion Height of ogive Freedom
610
To draw an epicycloid and cycloid
617
PAGE
622
Lead without engaging friction the drop catchings
623
Proportions of pinions of 6 7 8 and 9 leaves with engaging friction
629
Importance of varying the form of epicycloid
635
To remove causes of stoppage To alter diameter of pinion
641
Lantern pinion depths Worm wheel depth
647
Skew or bevel depths Depths with several teeth in action
653
General considerations Weight motors 68
661
Extracts from MM Itozes Memoir on mainsprings
666
Free mainsprings Stopwork The pivoted brace
672
Laws of elasticity of flexure and torsion
679
The pendulum Historical notice
686
The compound pendulum Centre of oscillation Form of pendulum Berthouds
693
Excessive length Very short pendulums
701
Construction of compensation pendulums
708
Theoretical considerations Moment of inertia Regulating power
714
Elements of the new theory of the annular balance
720
Weight of balance dependent on motive force Distribution of the weight
728
Influence of centrifugal force on compensation balances
735
To make a compensation balance
741
Various forms of balancesprings
748
Theoretical and practical isochronism
756
To calculate the number of vibrations
760
7The flat balancespring limits of its isochronism The movable stud
766
To promptly regulate clocks and watches after repair
790
Keyless watches
796
Perpetnal calendar To draw the equation cam
804
Micrometers Note on constant force or remontoire escapements
813
Tables for facilitating the mutual conversion of English and French measures
819
516
827
Theoretical and practical proof of these propositions The motive power
833
Key to the Plates
841

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