R is for Russia

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Frances Lincoln Children's, 2011 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 32 pages
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From Dacha to Winter Palace, from Easter Eggs to Kremlin, here is a photographic alphabet of everything we love best about Russia. The Russian Federation is a vast land of forests and steppes, deserts, rivers, lakes and big cities. Over centuries of splendour, revolution and change, our country has produced some of the greatest scientists, sportsmen and women, writers, dancers and composers in the world.
As you turn the pages of this book, you will see many of the things which make Russia so special: its fine palaces and churches, its musical and cultural traditions, its magnificent scenery and spectacular winter landscapes – and you will also see the food, the sports, as well as ordinary Russian people going about their everyday lives.
The perfect introduction to a fascinating country.

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About the author (2011)

PRODEEPTA DAS was born in Cuttack, in eastern India. He is a freelance photographer and author whose pictures have been published in over 20 children's books. In 1991, Inside India, which he also wrote, won the Commonwealth Photographer's Award. Prodeepta's books for Frances Lincoln are P is for Pakistan (9781847800893), Prita Goes to India (9781845074302), K is for Korea (9781847801333), We are Britain! (9781845071431), Geeta's Day (9781847801128), I is for India (9781845073206), J is for Jamaica (9781845076092), Kamal Goes to Trinidad (9781847800428), P is for Poland (9781847823528), T is for Turkey (9781845079987), S is for South Africa (9781847800183), R is for Russia (9781847801029) and B is for Bangladesh (9781845079185).

 

VLADIMIR KABAKOV was born in Irkutsk, in Siberia. After leaving school, he did his military service in the Soviet Army and worked at the University of Irkutsk. He has been a carpenter, geologist and teacher, and is a sports coach and director of a St Petersburg youth club. He is also a writer and journalist. His latest Russian book, They say that Bears Don't Bite was published in 2007. Vladimir now lives in London, and returns to Russia every year. He is married with two children.

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