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Books Books 1 - 4 of 4 on ... themfelves, you perceive nothing but land ; but when the furface of the earth....  
" ... themfelves, you perceive nothing but land ; but when the furface of the earth is fufficiently heated by the rays of the fun, and indeed until it begins to get cold towards the evening, the land no longer feems to have the fame extenfion, but to be.... "
Memoirs Relative to Egypt: Written in that Country During the Campaigns of ... - Page 76
by Institut d'Égypte (1798-1801) - 1800 - 459 pages
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Memoirs Relative to Egypt: Written in that Country During the Campaigns of ...

Institut d'Egypte (1798-1801) - Egypt - 1800 - 459 pages
...evening, the land no longer feems to have the fame extenfion, but to be terminated, to within the diftance of about a league, by a general inundation. The villages...fpectator is feparated by an extent of land, more or lefe confzderable, according to cifcumftances. You then behold the image of each of thefe villages...
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The British Critic: A New Review, Volume 17

Theology - 1801
...evening, the land no longer feems to have the fame extenfion, but to be terminated, to within the diiluucc of about a league, by a general inundation. " The villages placed beyond that, appear like fo many ifbndj ftationed in the midft of a great lake, from which the fpeclator is fcparated by an extent of...
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The British Critic and Quarterly Theological Review, Volume 17

1801
...the land no longer feems to bave the (ame extenfion, but to be terminated, to within .the diftancc of about a league, by a general inundation. " The villages placed beyond that, appear like fo many ¡(lands flationed in the rnidlt of 'a great lake, (rom which the f¡>.vi:uor is feparated by an extent...
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The Boston Journal of Philosophy and the Arts, Volume 3

John White Webster, John Ware - Science - 1826
...evening, the land no longer seems to have the same extension, but to be terminated to within the distance of about a league, by a general inundation. ', The villages placed beyond that, appear like so many islands stationed in the midst of a great lake, from which the spectator is separated by an...
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