Roman Gods: A Conceptual Approach

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BRILL, 2009 - Religion - 219 pages
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The book is concerned with the question of how the concept of "god" in urban Rome can be analyzed along the lines of six constituent concepts, i.e. space, time, personnel, function, iconography and ritual. While older publications tended to focus on the conceptual nature of Roman gods only in those (comparatively rare) instances in which different concepts patently overlapped (as in the case of the deified emperor or hero-worship), this book develops general criteria for an analysis of pagan, Jewish and Christian concepts of gods in ancient Rome (and by extension elsewhere). While the argument of the book is exclusively based on the evidence from the capital up to the age of Constantine, in the concluding section the results are compared to other religious belief systems, thus demonstrating the general applicability of this conceptual approach.
  

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Contents

Constituent Concepts
11
2 Time
30
3 Personnel
51
4 Function
66
5 Iconography
88
6 Ritual
103
Conceptualization
117
2 Deification
127
A Test Case The Secular Games of 17 BC
147
2 Carmen Saeculare
159
Concepts and Society
167
1 The Elite
168
2 The Underprivileged
177
3 Women
181
Bibliography
195
Index
211

3 Differentiation
132
4 Dissolution
142

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About the author (2009)

Michael Lipka, DPhil (Berlin 1997), DPhil (Oxford 2000), is Assistant Professor of Latin at the University of Patras in Greece, and has published on Greek and Roman literature and culture, including work on Xenophon, Vergil, and Pompeian domestic cults.

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