The Idiot (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Aug 31, 2004 - Fiction - 768 pages
273 Reviews
Inspired by an image of Christ's suffering, Fyodor Dostoyevsky set out to portray "a truly beautiful soul" colliding with the brutal reality of contemporary society. Returning to St. Petersburg from a Swiss sanatorium, the gentle and naive Prince Myshkin—known as "the idiot"—pays a visit to his distant relative General Yepanchin and proceeds to charm the General and his circle. But after becoming infatuated with the beautiful Nastasya Filippovna, Myshkin finds himself caught up in a love triangle and drawn into a web of blackmail, betrayal, and, ultimately, murder. This new translation by David McDuff is sensitive to the shifting registers of the original Russian, capturing the nervous, elliptic flow of the narrative for a new generation of readers.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
105
4 stars
44
3 stars
26
2 stars
17
1 star
9

Dostoevsky's writing is simply incredible. - weRead
like a bad parody of jane austin. - weRead
Amazing. The ending is horrific. - weRead
very hard to read, but still wonderful - weRead
complex and tragic character development - weRead
The ending is awful. - weRead

Review: The Idiot

User Review  - William - Goodreads

Here's Dostoyevski's mode of proceeding, and it's maddening. One, here's what I'm about to tell you; two, now here I am actually telling it to you; and three, now let's review what I've just told you ... Read full review

Review: The Idiot (Biblioteka jutarnjeg lista_Lektira_klasici #3)

User Review  - Megan Baxter - Goodreads

What is the difference between simplicity and being an idiot? In different ways, this question is asked over and over again over the course of this book. And can an honest man survive in society - to ... Read full review

All 273 reviews »

Related books

Contents

NOTES
PART ONE
PART TWO
PART THREE
PART FOUR
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821–1881), one of nineteenth-century Russia’s greatest novelists, spent four years in a convict prison in Siberia, after which he was obliged to enlist in the army. In later years his penchant for gambling sent him deeply into debt. Most of his important works were written after 1864, including Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov, all available from Penguin Classics.


David McDuff was educated at the University of Edinburgh and has translated a number of works for Penguin Classics, including Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.


William Mills Todd III is a professor of Slavic languages at Harvard.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821–1881), one of nineteenth-century Russia’s greatest novelists, spent four years in a convict prison in Siberia, after which he was obliged to enlist in the army. In later years his penchant for gambling sent him deeply into debt. Most of his important works were written after 1864, including Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov, all available from Penguin Classics.


David McDuff was educated at the University of Edinburgh and has translated a number of works for Penguin Classics, including Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.


William Mills Todd III is a professor of Slavic languages at Harvard.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821–1881), one of nineteenth-century Russia’s greatest novelists, spent four years in a convict prison in Siberia, after which he was obliged to enlist in the army. In later years his penchant for gambling sent him deeply into debt. Most of his important works were written after 1864, including Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov, all available from Penguin Classics.


David McDuff was educated at the University of Edinburgh and has translated a number of works for Penguin Classics, including Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.


William Mills Todd III is a professor of Slavic languages at Harvard.

Bibliographic information