The Child Savers: The Invention of Delinquency

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University of Chicago Press, Jun 15, 1977 - Social Science - 240 pages
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Anthony Platt's study, a chronicle of the child-saving movement and the juvenile court, explodes myth after myth about the benign character of both. The movement is described not as an effort to liberate and dignify youth but as a punitive, romantic, and intrusive effort to control the lives of lower-class urban adolescents and to maintain their dependent status. In so doing Platt analyzes early views of criminal behavior, the origins of the reformatory system, the social values of middle-class reformers, and the handling of youthful offenders before and after the creation of separate juvenile jurisdictions.

In this second, enlarged edition of The Child Savers, the author has added a new introduction and postscript in which he critically reflects upon his original analysis, suggests new ways of thinking about the child-saving movement, and summarizes recent developments in the juvenile justice system.
  

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Contents

Introduction
3
Images of Delinquency 18701900
15
The New Penology
46
Maternal Justice
75
The ChildSaving Movement in Illinois 1 o 1
101
The Fate of the Juvenile Court
137
A Concluding Note
176
Postscript 1977
183
Appendix
193
Bibliography
213
Index
233
Copyright

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About the author (1977)

Anthony M. Platt is a professor in the School of Social Work at California State University at Sacramento. He is the author of The Politics of Riot Commissions, and coauthor of Policing America and The Iron Fist and the Velvet Glove: An Analysis of the U.S. Police.


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