The Miscellaneous Works of Edward Gibbon, Esq: With Memoirs of His Life and Writings, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1814 - English literature
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Contents

A Dissertation on the Allegorical Beings found on the
35
Enters a Gentleman Commoner at Magdalen College
40
A Dissertation on the subject of lHomme au Masque
41
Observations sur les Mémoires Posthumes de M de Ché
48
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon on his Arrival at Paris
52
Mr Gibbon to G L Scott Esq proposing the esta
68
The Author is removed to Lausanne and placed under
73
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the Test
74
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the Death
81
The Authors Account of the Books he read and of
87
On the Character of Brutus Date uncertain
95
Mr Gibbon makes the Tour of Switzerland forms a Cor
97
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the East India
99
Some Account of Mademoiselle Curchod afterwards
105
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd at Edinburgh
109
On Mr Hurds Commentary on Horace Written Feb 1762
113
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydApologies for
122
Mr Gibbon publishes his first Work Essai mtr IEhide tie
126
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on Parliamentary
133
The Authors manner of passing his time in the Hampshire
134
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydPoliticalon sending
139
Les Principales Epoques de lHistoire de la Grèce et
150
Dr Jos Wartoii to Mr Gibbon on the first Volume
152
The Author passes some rime at Paris gives an Account
155
Hon Horace Walpole to Mr Gibbon on Mr Gib
158
c XVII
161
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydMadame Neckers
164
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the Affairs
165
Extrait de trois Mémoires de M LAbbé de la Bleterie
169
On the Position of the Meridional Line and the supposed
170
XXXVH Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the American
173
Selections from Mr Gibbons Extraits Raisonnes de mes Lec
176
The Author determines to write an History its Subject
177
Remarques Critiques sur le Nombre des Habitans dans
178
Dr Watson to Mr Gibbon in Answer to the above
181
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd on the American Affairs
192
Mr Gibbon to Mr Holroyd April 21st 1777
198
Relation des Noces de Charles Duc de Bourgogne avec
202
Dr Robertson to Mr GibbonDr Robertsons
204
Some Account of Mr Gibbons Studies at Lausanne prepa
205
Mr Gibbon and M Deyverdun engage in a Periodical
207
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydAmerican Affairs
209
Mr Gibbon to Mr HolroydAmerican Affairs
216
Mr Gibbon settles in Londonbegins his History of
217
Dr Robertson to Mr Gibbon on the two new
249
Dr Robertson to Mr Gibbon on continuing his His
255
Mr Gibbon pays a Visit to Lord Sheffield in England
256
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldResignationsNew
259
Dr Priestley to Mr Gibbon in Answer Birming
266
Mr Gibbon to Lord Thurlow offering his Services
272
Narrative by Lord Sheffield connecting ilie Memoirs with
277
Principes des Poids des Monnoies et des Mesures des
279
Madame Necker a M Gibbonbcr Disquietude
284
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon on the French Revolu
293
Madam de Genhs a M Gibbon recommending
304
Contrast of the Political Temper of Lord North and M
311
Mr Gibbon to Lord offering to accept
317
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield on his Depar
324
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldM Deyverdun
328
Remarques touchant les Doutes Historiques sur la Vie et
331
Correspondence continuedMr Gibbons Letter to
333
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldComparison
334
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Portenhis Friendship with
340
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldPoliticalMr
347
Invasion of Savoy by the French Army under M de Mon
350
Mr Gibbon visits M Neckerthe Company he there meets
353
Mr Gibbon to Mrs GibbonAccount of his
355
CCIIL Mr Gibbon to Lady Sheffieldeminent Persons
365
Mr Gibbons Letter to the Honourable Miss Holroyd
368
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldContentment with
374
The declining Health of M de Severy Desertion of
378
Revolution at GenevaGreat Britain happily adheres
384
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield Jan 17th 1786
387
Lady Sheffields Death and Mr Gibbons immediate resolu
397
Mr Gibbon to Lord Sheffield on the Conclusion
401
Narrative continued by Lord SheffieldMr Gibbons social
408
Mr Gibbon to Lord SheffieldAttack of Gout
411
Lord North to Mr Gibbon with Thanks for
418
Mr Gibbon to Mrs Gibbon on the Riots in Lon
420
Abstract of Mr Gibbons Will
426
Professor Heyne to M Gibbon recommending
439
Mr Gibbon to Lady Elizabeth Foster now
471
Mr Gibbon to Idy Elizabeth FosterDeath
483
Dr Vincent to Mr Gibbon on the same Subject
489
Mr Gibbon to Lord Auckland St Jamess
495
Dr Cooke Dean of Ely and Provost of Kings
496
mer 502
502
d CCLXIII
529

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - Thou hast most traitorously corrupted the youth of the realm in erecting a grammar school; and whereas, before, our forefathers had no other books but the score and the tally, thou hast caused printing to be used, and, contrary to the king, his crown and dignity, thou hast built a paper-mill.
Page 238 - That the influence of the crown had increased, was increasing, and ought to be diminished"; and Mr.
Page 220 - The style of an author should be the image of his mind, but the choice and command of language is the fruit of exercise. Many experiments were made before I could hit the middle tone between a dull chronicle and a rhetorical declamation: three times did I compose the first chapter, and twice the second and third, before I was tolerably satisfied with their effect.
Page 142 - ... thorough profligate in principle as in practice, his life stained with every vice. and his conversation full of blasphemy and indecency. These morals he glories in — for shame is a weakness he has long since surmounted. He told us himself, that in this time of public dissension he was resolved to make his fortune.
Page 224 - The favour of mankind is most freely bestowed on a new acquaintance of any original merit; and the mutual surprise of the public and their favourite is productive of those warm sensibilities, which at a second meeting can no longer be rekindled. If I listened to the music of praise, I was more seriously satisfied with the approbation of my judges. The candour of Dr. Robertson embraced his disciple. A letter from Mr. Hume overpaid the labour of ten years, but I have never presumed to accept a place...
Page 196 - After a sleepless night, I trod, with a lofty step, the ruins of the Forum; each memorable spot where Romulus stood, or Tully spoke, or Caesar fell, was at once present to my eye; and several days of intoxication were lost or enjoyed before I could descend to a cool and minute investigation.
Page 253 - He seemed to feel, and even to envy, the happiness of my situation while I admired the powers of a superior man, as they are blended in his attractive character with the softness and simplicity of a child.
Page 53 - The fellows or monks of my time were decent easy men, who supinely enjoyed the gifts of the founder : their days were filled by a scries of uniform form employments; the chapel and the hall, the coffee-house and the common room, till they retired, -weary and well satisfied, to a long slumber. From the toil of reading, or thinking, or writing, they had absolved their conscience...
Page 2 - A lively desire of knowing and of recording our ancestors so generally prevails, that it must depend on the influence of some common principle in the minds of men.
Page 198 - It was at Rome, on the 15th of October 1764, as I sat musing amidst the ruins of the Capitol, while the barefooted friars were singing vespers in the temple of Jupiter,* that the idea of writing the decline and fall of the city first started to my mind.

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