The history of the worthies of England, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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T. Tegg, 1840 - England
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1840 / pp314-356 / 19
Note: Extract for Wiltshire

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Page 285 - English man-ofwar, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Page 22 - ... now there was found in it a poor wise man, and he by his wisdom delivered the city; yet no man remembered that same poor man. Then said I, "Wisdom is better than strength: nevertheless the poor man's wisdom is despised, and his words are not heard.
Page 284 - Many were the wit-combats betwixt him and Ben Jonson, which two I behold like a Spanish great galleon, and an English man-of-war ; Master Jonson (like the former) was built far higher in learning ; solid, but slow in his performances.
Page 188 - Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken anything from any man by false accusation, I restore him fourfold.
Page 20 - Also the citye of London, that is to me so dere and swete, in which I was forth growen ; and more kindely love have I to that place than to any other in yerth, as every kindely creture hath full appetite to that place of his kindely engendrure, and to wilne reste and pece in that stede to abide.
Page 179 - To whom I answered, It is not the manner of the Romans to deliver any man to die, before that he which is accused have the accusers face to face, and have licence to answer for himself concerning the crime laid against him.
Page 285 - Remain a lasting monument of his glory ; And when thy ruins shall disclaim To be the treasurer of his name, His name, that cannot fade, shall be An everlasting monument to thee.
Page 41 - Queen, in whose service he continued many years. At a masque given at court, the King's gigantic porter drew him out of his pocket, to the surprise of all the spectators. Thus favoured by royalty, the humility incident to his birth forsook him, which made him that he did not know himself, and would not know his father, and which, by the King's command, caused, justly, his sound correction.
Page 140 - Tarlton before they would go to the queen, and he was their usher to prepare their advantageous access unto her. In a word, he told the queen more of her faults than most of her chaplains, and cured her melancholy better than all of her physicians. Much of his merriment lay in his very looks and actions, according to the epitaph written upon him : ' Hie situs est cnjus poterat vox, actio, vultus, Ex Heraclito reddere Democritum.
Page 161 - As a jewel of gold in a swine's snout, so is a, fair woman which is without discretion.

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