Japan 1853-1864: or, Genji yume monogatari (Google eBook)

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Naigai suppan kyokai, 1905 - Japan - 242 pages
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Page 6 - they will give us philosophical instruments, machinery, and other curiosities, will take ignorant people in, and trade being their chief object, they will manage bit by bit to impoverish the country ; after which they will treat us just as they like ; perhaps behave with the greatest rudeness and insult us, and end by swallowing up Japan. If we do not drive them away now, we shall never have another opportunity. If we now resort to a dilatory method of proceeding we shall regret it afterwards when...
Page 15 - The President of the United States, at the request of the Japanese government, will act as a friendly mediator in such matters of difference as may arise between the government of Japan and any European power.
Page 7 - ... as one family, we shall be able to go abroad and give lands in foreign countries to those who have distinguished themselves in battle ; the soldiers will vie with one another in displaying their intrepidity, and it will not be too late then to declare war. Now we shall have to defend ourselves against these foreign enemies skilled in the use of mechanical appliances, with our soldiers whose military skill has considerably diminished during a long peace of three hundred years, and we certainly...
Page 7 - Rather than allow this, as we are not the equals of foreigners in the mechanical arts, let us have intercourse with foreign countries, learn their drill and tactics, and when we have made the nation as united as one family, we shall be able to go abroad and give lands in foreign countries to those who have distinguished themselves in battle.
Page 4 - Yedo were informed that they were at liberty to state any ideas they might have on the subject, and, although they all gave their opinions, the diversity of propositions was so great that no decision was arrived at. ' The military class had, during a long peace, neglected military arts ; they had given themselves up to pleasure and luxury, and there were very few who had put on armour for many years, so that they were greatly alarmed at the prospect that war might break out at a moment's notice,...
Page 7 - ... this. Soldiers who have distinguished themselves are rewarded by grants of land, or else you attack and seize the enemy's territory, and that becomes your own property ; so every man is encouraged to fight his best. " But, in a war with foreign countries, a man may undergo hardships for years, may fight as if his life were worth nothing, and, as all the land in this country...
Page 62 - And so," says the native chronicler, " the prestige of the Tokugawa family, which had endured for three hundred years, which had been really -more brilliant than Kamakura in the age of Yoritomo on a moonlight night when the stars are shining, which for more than two hundred and seventy years had forced the...
Page 1 - States of America, suddenly arrived at Uraga, in the province of Sagami, with four ships of war, declaring that he brought a letter from his country to Japan, and that he wished to deliver it to the Sovereign. The Governor of the place, Toda Idzu No Kami, much alarmed by this extraordinary event, hastened to the spot to inform himself of its meaning. The envoy stated, in reply to questions, that he desired to see a chief...
Page 4 - The assembled officials were exceedingly disturbed, and nearly broke their hearts over consultations which lasted all day and all night. The nobles and retired nobles in Yedo were informed that they were at liberty to state any ideas they might have on the subject, and although they all gave their opinions, the diversity of propositions was so great, that no decision was arrived at.
Page 2 - At first the fear seemed so sudden and so formidable that they were too alarmed to open their mouths, but in the end orders were issued to the great clans to keep strict watch at various points on the shore, as it was possible that the 'barbarian' vessels might proceed to commit acts of violence.

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