The Awkward Age

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, Jan 1, 1987 - Fiction - 323 pages
13 Reviews
Making her debut in London society, Nanda Brookenham is being groomed for the marriage market. Thrust suddenly into the superficial and immoral circle that surrounds her mother, the innocent but independent-minded young woman even finds herself in competition with Mrs Brookenham for the affection of the man she admires. Only an elderly bachelor, Mr Longdon, is immune to this world of greed and scheming, and determines to rescue Nanda from its corrupting influences out of loyalty to the deep love he once felt for her grandmother. In The Awkward Age (1899), Henry James explores the English character, and the clash between old and new money with a light and subtly ironic touch to create a devastating critique of society and its machinations.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
4
3 stars
0
2 stars
2
1 star
2

Review: The Awkward Age

User Review  - William Leight - Goodreads

The first thing you notice about "The Awkward Age" is that it's basically all dialogue. My personal theory, backed up by exactly zero evidence, is that this is a manifestation of James' desire to be a ... Read full review

Review: The Awkward Age

User Review  - Lucy - Goodreads

Let's just say I'm extremely glad I didn't pay for this. I'd have wanted my money back. I've now read all but two of James's novels, and most of them I have awarded top marks - but this was just tosh ... Read full review

About the author (1987)

Henry James (1843-1916), born in New York City, was the son of noted religious philosopher Henry James, Sr., and brother of eminent psychologist and philosopher William James. He spent his early life in America and studied in Geneva, London and Paris during his adolescence to gain the worldly experience so prized by his father. He lived in Newport, went briefly to Harvard Law School, and in 1864 began to contribute both criticism and tales to magazines.

In 1869, and then in 1872-74, he paid visits to Europe and began his first novel, Roderick Hudson. Late in 1875 he settled in Paris, where he met Turgenev, Flaubert, and Zola, and wrote The American (1877). In December 1876 he moved to London, where two years later he achieved international fame with Daisy Miller. Other famous works include Washington Square (1880), The Portrait of a Lady (1881), The Princess Casamassima (1886), The Aspern Papers (1888), The Turn of the Screw (1898), and three large novels of the new century, The Wings of the Dove (1902), The Ambassadors (1903) and The Golden Bowl (1904). In 1905 he revisited the United States and wrote The American Scene (1907).

During his career he also wrote many works of criticism and travel. Although old and ailing, he threw himself into war work in 1914, and in 1915, a few months before his death, he became a British subject. In 1916 King George V conferred the Order of Merit on him. He died in London in February 1916.

Bibliographic information