500 Years of Indigenous Resistance (Google eBook)

Front Cover
PM Press, Nov 1, 2009 - History - 96 pages
8 Reviews
An alternative and unorthodox view of the colonization of the Americas by Europeans is offered in this concise history. Eurocentric studies of the conquest of the Americas present colonization as a civilizing force for good, and the native populations as primitive or worse. Colonization is seen as a mutually beneficial process, in which "civilization” was brought to the natives who in return shared their land and cultures. The opposing historical camp views colonization as a form of genocide in which the native populations were passive victims overwhelmed by European military power. In this fresh examination, an activist and historian of native descent argues that the colonial powers met resistance from the indigenous inhabitants and that these confrontations shaped the forms and extent of colonialism. This account encompasses North and South America, the development of nation-states, and the resurgence of indigenous resistance in the post-World War II era.
  

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Review: 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance

User Review  - Tony - Goodreads

Covers interesting material, but in a dense, academic way. Read full review

Review: 500 Years of Indigenous Resistance

User Review  - Goodreads

Covers interesting material, but in a dense, academic way. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
6
The PreColumbian World
7
The Genocide Begins
11
Expansion Exploitation and Extermination
15
The Penetration of North America
18
The European Struggle for Hegemony
24
The United States is Created
27
Revolutions in the New World
30
Black Reconstruction and Deconstruction
40
The Colonization of Canada
43
Two Methods One Goal
50
The People AIM for Freedom
58
The Struggle for Land
63
In Total Resistance
66
About PM Press
71
Friends of PM Press
72

Manifest Destiny and the US Indian Wars
35
Afrikan Slavery Afrikan Rebellion and the US Civil War
37

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About the author (2009)

Gord Hill is a member of the Kwakwaka'wakw nation. He is a writer, an artist, and a militant activist. He has been active in the Indigenous resistance, anticolonial, and anticapitalist movements—often using the pseudonym Zig Zag. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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