The Unity of the Organism: Or, The Organismal Conception of Life (Google eBook)

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R.G. Badger, 1919 - Biology
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Page 318 - ice fancy some strong emotion, and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all the feelings of its bodily symptoms, we find ice have nothing left behind, no 'mind-stuff' out of which the emotion can be constituted, and that a cold and neutral state of intellectual perception is all that remains.
Page 299 - It must certainly be allowed, that nature has kept us at a great distance from all her secrets, and has afforded us only the knowledge of a few superficial qualities of objects; while she conceals from us those powers and principles on which the influence of those objects entirely depends.
Page 300 - eat, nourished me; that is, a body of such sensible qualities was, at that time, endued with such secret powers: but does it follow that other bread must also nourish me at another time, and that like sensible qualities must always be attended with like secret powers? The
Page 223 - Come, come," says Mercutio to Benvolio, "thou art as hot a Jack in thy mood as any in Italy. . . . Nay, an there were two such, we should have none shortly, for one would kill the other.
Page 321 - Our whole cubic capacity is sensibly alive; and each morsel of it contributes its pulsations of feeling, dim or sharp, pleasant, painful, or dubious, to that sense of personality that every one of us unfamiliarly carries with him. It is surprising what little items give accent to these complexes of sensibility.
Page 300 - There is required a medium, which may enable the mind to draw such an inference, if indeed it be drawn by reasoning and argument. What that medium is, I must confess, passes my comprehension: and it is incumbent on those to produce it, who assert that it really exists, and is the origin of all our conclusions concerning matter of fact.
Page 300 - If a body of like colour and consistence with that bread, which we have formerly eat, be presented to us, we make no scruple of repeating the experiment, and foresee, with certainty, like nourishment and support. Now this is a process of the mind,
Page 219 - there is no conception in a man's mind which hath not at first, totally or by parts, been begotten upon the organs of sense,
Page 168 - A simple reflex is probably a pure abstract conception, because all parts of the nervous system are connected together and no part of it is probably ever capable of reaction without affecting and being affected by various other parts, and it is a system certainly never absolutely at rest.
Page 300 - nowise necessary. At least, it must be acknowledged that there is here a consequence drawn by the mind; that there is a certain step taken; a process of thought, and an inference, which wants to be explained.

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