Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

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Harper Collins, Jan 1, 1998 - Biography & Autobiography - 298 pages
56 Reviews
Why would a talented young girl go through the looking glass and step into a netherworld where up is down and food is greed, where death is honor and flesh is weak? Why enter into a love affair with hunger, drugs, sex, and death? Marya Hornbacher sustains both anorexia and bulimia through five lengthy hospitalizations, endless therapy, and the loss of family, friends, jobs, and ultimately, any sense of what it means to be "normal." By the time she is in college, Hornbacher is in the grip of a bout with anorexia so horrifying that it will forever put to rest the romance of wasting away. In this vivid, emotionally wrenching memoir, she re-created the experience and illuminated that tangle of personal, family, and cultural causes underlying eating disorders. Wasted is the story of one woman's travels to the darker side of reality, and her decision to find her way back--on her own terms.
  

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The prose is fantastic. - Goodreads
Beautifully written, honest and rich with insight. - Goodreads
The author is clearly a talented writer. - Goodreads

Review: Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

User Review  - Elyse - Goodreads

I read this book when it was first released ---(its 'very' disturbing). I wouldn't know how many stars to give it actually. I never like to 'rate' memoirs in the first place. I can't give it 5 stars ... Read full review

Review: Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

User Review  - Rachel Brown - Goodreads

Beautifully written and extremely intense, and well worth reading even if you have no interest whatsoever in the subject matter. I didn't when I picked it up, but my attention was caught by the ... Read full review

All 23 reviews »

Contents

Childhood
9
Bulimia
36
The Actors Part
88
Methodist Hospital Take 1
145
Lockup
181
Waiting for Godot
214
Dying Is an Art Like Everything Else
244
Bibliography
291
Copyright

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Page 95 - Fire and Ice Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice. From what I've tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire. But if it had to perish twice, I think I know enough of hate To say that for destruction ice Is also great And would suffice.
Page 76 - Who are you?" said the Caterpillar. This was not an encouraging opening for a conversation. Alice replied, rather shyly, "I — I hardly know, sir, just at present — at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then.
Page 275 - I came to explore the wreck. The words are purposes. The words are maps. I came to see the damage that was done and the treasures that prevail.
Page 76 - It isn't," said the Caterpillar. "Well, perhaps you haven't found it so yet," said Alice, "but when you have to turn into a chrysalis— you will some day, you know— and then after that into a butterfly, I should think you'll feel it a little queer, won't you?" "Not a bit," said the Caterpillar. "Well, perhaps your feelings may be different," said Alice; "all I know is, it would feel very queer to me.
Page 244 - Dying Is an art, like everything else. I do it exceptionally well. I do it so it feels like hell. I do it so it feels real. I guess you could say I've a call.
Page 9 - Well, it's no use your talking about waking him," said Tweedledum, "when you're only one of the things in his dream. You know very well you're not real.
Page 76 - THE Caterpillar and Alice looked at each other for some time in silence: at last the Caterpillar took the hookah out of its mouth, and addressed her in a languid, sleepy voice. "Who are^ow?
Page 145 - So, so, Herr Doktor. So, Herr Enemy. I am your opus, I am your valuable, The pure gold baby That melts to a shriek.
Page 36 - I shall be too late!" (When she thought it over afterward, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural.) But when the Rabbit actually took a watch out of its waistcoat pocket, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet.

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About the author (1998)

Marya Hornbacher is the author of two best-selling nonfiction titles, "Madness: A Bipolar Life" and "Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia"; the recovery handbook "Sane: Mental Illness, Addiction, and the 12 Steps"; and the critically acclaimed novel "The Center of Winter". She is currently working on a new novel and is active in the Twin Cities recovery community.

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